Let kids choose their own activities: “Executive function” study says freer kids are better off.
Kids Who Direct Their Own Activities Score Higher on “Executive Function” (Video)
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July 8 2014 3:49 PM

The “Executive Function” Puzzle

New research suggests kids who direct their own activities have better outcomes.

Children playing in a forest in June 2012 as part of "I Ur och Skur Utsikten," in Lidingö, Sweden.
Children playing in a forest in June 2012 as part of "I Ur och Skur Utsikten," in Lidingö, Sweden. I Ur och Skur means "In Rain or Shine" and refers to the schools that conduct their curricula primarily outside, year-round.

Photos courtesy Matthew Browning

A University of Colorado study examined the schedules of 6-year-olds and found the more free time and self-directed play time children had, the higher they scored in tests of “executive function” skills.

Chris Wade is a New York-based video and audio producer and an occasional contributor to Brow Beat.  

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