A preview of Microsoft Windows 7.

Innovation, the Internet, gadgets, and more.
Dec. 31 2008 5:39 PM

Vista Revisited

The new version of Microsoft Windows is a lot like the old one. But better.

Screenshot of Windows 7. Click image to expand.
A screenshot of Windows 7

Last summer, Microsoft's marketing department pulled a strange stunt to prove that its latest operating system, Windows Vista, isn't as terrible as everyone on the Internet claims. The company invited 140 people who said they hated Vista to take part in a focus-group review of the new Microsoft OS, Windows Mojave. The malcontents were blown away by all of Mojave's amazing features, like how well it organized photos and music—why didn't the company put all this great stuff in Vista? That's when Microsoft's sales team dropped the bomb: Windows "Mojave" was actually Windows Vista! The company had rebranded its beleaguered OS to prove that much of what troubled the software was in people's heads, not in the program itself. As long as customers don't know they're using Vista, they love it.

Microsoft seems to have taken the results of that zany focus group to heart. Last week, copies of Windows 7, the first beta version of the new OS, leaked to file-sharing sites online. (The company plans an official release of the beta to developers and the public early in 2009.) I downloaded Windows 7 and installed it to my laptop, and after a couple days of using it, here's what I can report: "Windows 7" is actually Windows Vista—or at most a tidied-up retread.

Advertisement

Microsoft's next OS is not a whole-cloth reimagining of the sort you'd expect after a stinging failure. In building Windows 7, engineers didn't go back to the drawing board—they went back to the body shop. They tweaked many small details, fixing some of Vista's most persistent problems and adding several user-interface features that I found very handy. They also improved its speed and handling, rendering it snappier than Windows XP, the long-lived OS that many people—myself included—used in place of Vista.

The results are pretty great. Though still in beta, Windows 7 runs like a final version; it'll only improve as it nears its final release date (sometime in the summer or fall) and thus looks certain to strengthen Microsoft's hold over the PC desktop now and for years to come. That should come as no surprise: For all the bad press it received, Vista never posed any long-term danger to the Windows hegemony. True, sales of Macs have been up lately, but that's sort of like pointing out that soccer is gaining ground as an American spectator sport—perhaps technically true but somewhat beside the point. Nine out of every 10 PCs in the world run Windows. With this new version, the Windows world will now have a chance, after too long, to use an OS that doesn't feel like drudgery.

I installed Windows 7 on a new partition on a new hard drive—that is, uncluttered by a stack of old programs and any previous installation of the OS and thus probably not representative of what people will encounter when they install 7 over their current version of Windows (or on a new computer that's clogged with unnecessary apps installed by the manufacturer). That said, the results were impressive: With Windows 7, my machine booted up in less than 20 seconds and returned from sleep mode instantly. Under previous versions of Windows, rebooting the machine was an occasion for a long coffee break, and putting it to sleep went pretty much as that phrase suggests—sometimes, the sleep was permanent.

The speed improvements are of a piece with Windows 7's generally streamlined packaging. Ten years ago, Microsoft's practice of "bundling" extra applications into its OS blew up into a federal case. The company insisted that integrating programs like a Web browser benefited users while the government argued that Microsoft was aiming to leverage its OS monopoly into other areas of the software business. The feds won that argument in court; now Microsoft seems to have seen the business merits of what you might call unbundling. You'll still find Internet Explorer in Windows 7, but unlike previous versions, the new OS doesn't ship with an e-mail program, a calendar, a movie editor, and a photo manager. Instead, Windows 7 prompts users to get this software from Microsoft's Windows Live online service. This move surely follows its own business logic—Microsoft wants to encourage people to use its online apps in an effort to fight Google in the cloud software business, which many consider the future of the software industry. But in this case the business decision helps users, too: You no longer get an OS stuffed with apps you don't need and can instead stock your computer with free programs found online—whether from Microsoft, Google, Apple, or any other vendor.

Aesthetically, Windows 7 looks much more like Vista than XP or Mac OS X—its default color scheme is dark and businesslike, all slate grays and shiny blue-greens. Several attractive themes are built in, though—choose one, and you change the desktop image, window colors, and system sounds all at once. A few of these themes put your desktop's wallpaper on a slide show, switching the background image every few minutes; I picked one that showed stunning nature shots of various American landscapes.

TODAY IN SLATE

History

The Self-Made Man

The story of America’s most pliable, pernicious, irrepressible myth.

Michigan’s Tradition of Football “Toughness” Needs to Go—Starting With Coach Hoke

Does Your Child Have “Sluggish Cognitive Tempo”? Or Is That Just a Disorder Made Up to Scare You?

The First Case of Ebola in America Has Been Diagnosed in Dallas

Windows 8 Was So Bad That Microsoft Will Skip Straight to Windows 10

Politics

Mad About Modi


Why the controversial Indian prime minister drew 19,000 cheering fans to Madison Square Garden.


Building a Better Workplace

You Deserve a Pre-cation

The smartest job perk you’ve never heard of.

Don’t Panic! The U.S. Already Stops Ebola and Similar Diseases From Spreading. Here’s How.

Parents, Get Your Teenage Daughters the IUD

The XX Factor
Sept. 30 2014 12:34 PM Parents, Get Your Teenage Daughters the IUD
  News & Politics
Politics
Sept. 30 2014 6:59 PM The Democrats’ War at Home Can the president’s party defend itself from the president’s foreign policy blunders?
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 30 2014 7:02 PM At Long Last, eBay Sets PayPal Free
  Life
Gaming
Sept. 30 2014 7:35 PM Who Owns Scrabble’s Word List? Hasbro says the list of playable words belongs to the company. Players beg to differ.
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 30 2014 12:34 PM Parents, Get Your Teenage Daughters the IUD
  Slate Plus
Behind the Scenes
Sept. 30 2014 3:21 PM Meet Jordan Weissmann Five questions with Slate’s senior business and economics correspondent.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 30 2014 8:54 PM Bette Davis Talks Gender Roles in a Delightful, Animated Interview From 1963
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 30 2014 7:00 PM There’s Going to Be a Live-Action Tetris Movie for Some Reason
  Health & Science
Medical Examiner
Sept. 30 2014 6:44 PM Ebola Was Already Here How the United States contains deadly hemorrhagic fevers.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 30 2014 5:54 PM Goodbye, Tough Guy It’s time for Michigan to fire its toughness-obsessed coach, Brady Hoke.