The end of Moore's Law.

The end of Moore's Law.

Innovation, the Internet, gadgets, and more.
Dec. 20 2005 3:15 PM

The End of Moore's Law

Microchips are getting smaller—and that's the problem.

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Sure, multicore processors could spell the end of Moore's Law, and you might not be able to buy a videogame console that fits on the end of your pinky any time soon. But some laws are meant to be broken.

*Correction, December 20: This piece originally and incorrectly stated that Intel's microchips are "less than 100 nanometers in size" and are so small that factory workers can't see what they're manufacturing. It is the transistors on the chips, not the chips themselves, that aren't visible and are less than 100 nanometers in size. Also,the piece also stated incorrectly that a nanometer is "the equivalent of about 100 atoms." A nanometer is roughly equivalent to a line of 10 hydrogen atoms. Click here to return to the corrected section.

Adam L. Penenberg is an assistant professor at New York University and assistant director of the business and economic reporting program in the school's department of journalism. You can email him at penenberg@yahoo.com.

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