Seven Players and a Coach Explain What It’s Like to Beat Duke in the NCAA Tournament

The stadium scene.
March 20 2013 1:12 PM

I Beat Duke

What it’s like to take down college basketball’s most hated program, in the words of the men who did it.

Joe Mazzulla #3 of the West Virginia Mountaineers celebrates scoring against the Duke Blue Devils.
West Virginia's Joe Mazzulla celebrates scoring against the Duke Blue Devils during the second round of the NCAA tournament on March 22, 2008.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Read more from Slate’s coverage of the NCAA tournament.

Duke and coach Mike Krzyzewski have won four national championships. They’ve also lost in the NCAA tournament 24 times in the Coach K era, to the great delight of the nation’s legions of Blue Devil haters. We asked seven players and a coach to explain what it’s like to topple Duke during March Madness and whether Greg Paulus was as annoying as he seemed on TV.

Joe Mazzulla, West Virginia

In 2008, No. 7 seed West Virginia beat No. 2 seed Duke 73-67 in the second round. Mazzulla, a relatively unheralded sophomore guard, nearly had a triple-double, finishing with 13 points, 11 rebounds, and eight assists.

Advertisement

Everybody knows that the biggest thing about Duke is they slap the floor on defense. I was sitting with [teammate] Joe Alexander and we said, “If we get in that situation, why don’t we do it?” We may never play them again. So we make our run, and I’m in front of the bench, and I do it. I couldn’t see behind me. I don’t know if Joe Alexander did it, but I think that’s what got [Duke] going for the 2010 game. [Duke beat West Virginia in the 2010 Final Four.] I’m sure Coach K played that up a lot, and I’m sure that fired them up.

They were up [18-8], and I’ll never forget Greg Paulus was obviously talking smack and saying it was about over. For me, personally, Greg is—I didn’t really talk to him, I only played against him that one time—he’s one of those guys. I think he really likes to get under other people’s skin. The thing about that was that that was my role as well. So it was pretty much a battle of both of our roles. You had to stand up to him.

And as the game went on, it turned. D.C. [where the game was played] is very pro-West Virginia—there’s a big alumni base there. As the game went on, it turned more into a West Virginia atmosphere, especially the last six, seven minutes.

As a player I didn’t like [the Blue Devils] very much, and now I’ve been coaching for two years and I love everything about what they do and what they stand for. When you’re a competitor you almost hate them for how good they are.

Scotty Thurman, Arkansas

In the 1994 national title game, Arkansas—then-President Bill Clinton’s favorite teamtoppled Duke 76-72. Thurman, a sophomore guard, hit a go-ahead three-pointer with 50 seconds left to win the game for the Razorbacks.

thurman
Scotty Thurman (far left) and his Arkansas teammates celebrate beating Duke to win the national title in 1994.

Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

At that age, you want to go up against the best and have a chance to beat the best. For us, we felt like we had never received the respect we were supposed to. It was one of those deals where—here was another opportunity to prove that. For us, it was kind of like everybody thought they were going to beat us. We wanted to prove everybody wrong again. Coach [Nolan Richardson] kind of instilled an attitude in us that we were nomads. We didn’t perennially have all the McDonald’s All-Americans and didn’t necessarily have the big-name guys. Yet still we felt like we had a pretty good team. Going up against Duke, Coach K has done it for so long, they had great teams and gone to numerous Final Fours, had a chance to win some championships.

The biggest memory for me—outside of making that shot and winning the national championship—was that day somehow there was a mix-up with our shoot-around times. We got to the gym—usually a lot of times we’d go to the locker room, use the restroom or whatever, and kind of mess around for a few minutes of lag time before coach would actually want you out there ready to go. We got there, and our time was dwindling down. We had like, three minutes or so. I don’t even think we had three minutes. By the time we made it to the floor, it was like a minute-and-a-half or something. Guys were shooting a lot of rushed shots. I’m like, What’s going on? I think I had my headphones on. And all of a sudden I looked up at the clock and said, “Dang, we don’t even have any shoot-around time.” People were walking around there, getting ready for the president coming and setting up all the theatrical stuff that goes along with that, and I hear coach going off in the tunnel the whole time we were on the floor: “Nobody wants us to win. This was not supposed to happen. We thought we had the right shoot-around time.” Those kind of statements were being made, so it just kind of added fuel to the fire.

We felt like we were going to win the game. I didn’t think that I’d be faced with a last-second shot opportunity and have to make that shot.

The crazy thing about the play is Dwight Stewart, who was our center, he fumbled the ball, but he had the presence of mind to gather himself and to pass it. I think most guys would probably take an ill-advised shot. So when I saw him bobble the ball, I looked at the clock. I knew that when he did pass it, somebody—whoever caught it—was going to have to shoot. So it was probably in my mind that I was going to shoot, so I caught it, I just shot it, and it just so happened that [Duke forward] Antonio Lang—most people look at that photo and they see how close he was, because of the angle of the photo it looks like he could’ve blocked the shot. I’ve always disputed that, because I’ve got another photo that shows that the ball had already been released. He was close, but he wasn’t as close as the picture everyone sees in Sports Illustrated. Had he not jumped so far, he probably could’ve blocked it. But he kind of jumped from quite a bit of distance, so he was actually on his way down, and the ball was already gone. He wasn’t that close, but he was close. He was very close.

TODAY IN SLATE

Foreigners

More Than Scottish Pride

Scotland’s referendum isn’t about nationalism. It’s about a system that failed, and a new generation looking to take a chance on itself. 

What Charles Barkley Gets Wrong About Corporal Punishment and Black Culture

Why Greenland’s “Dark Snow” Should Worry You

If You’re Outraged by the NFL, Follow This Satirical Blowhard on Twitter

The Best Way to Organize Your Fridge

Politics

The GOP’s Focus on Fake Problems

Why candidates like Scott Walker are building campaigns on drug tests for the poor and voter ID laws.

Sports Nut

Giving Up on Goodell

How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.

Is It Worth Paying Full Price for the iPhone 6 to Keep Your Unlimited Data Plan? We Crunch the Numbers.

Farewell! Emily Bazelon on What She Will Miss About Slate.

  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 16 2014 7:03 PM Kansas Secretary of State Loses Battle to Protect Senator From Tough Race
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 16 2014 4:16 PM The iPhone 6 Marks a Fresh Chance for Wireless Carriers to Kill Your Unlimited Data
  Life
The Eye
Sept. 16 2014 12:20 PM These Outdoor Cat Shelters Have More Style Than the Average Home
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 15 2014 3:31 PM My Year As an Abortion Doula
  Slate Plus
Slate Plus Video
Sept. 16 2014 2:06 PM A Farewell From Emily Bazelon The former senior editor talks about her very first Slate pitch and says goodbye to the magazine.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 16 2014 6:23 PM Bryan Cranston Reenacts Baseball’s Best Moments to Promote the Upcoming Postseason
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 16 2014 6:40 PM This iPhone 6 Feature Will Change Weather Forecasting
  Health & Science
Science
Sept. 16 2014 4:09 PM It’s All Connected What links creativity, conspiracy theories, and delusions? A phenomenon called apophenia.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 15 2014 9:05 PM Giving Up on Goodell How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.