The Slate Plus Digest with reading recommendations from Slate and around the internet.

Looking Up After Charlottesville, in the Slate Plus Digest

Looking Up After Charlottesville, in the Slate Plus Digest

Comments
Slate Plus
Your all-access pass
Aug. 18 2017 10:15 PM
Comments

Looking Up After Charlottesville

The Slate Plus Digest for August 18.

Professional-Eaters-Compete-In-Annual-Nathans-Hot-Dog-Eating-Contest
Some hot dogs.

Getty Images

I lied—it’s me again at the helm of the Digest, after a long week in which a lot went down—including Confederate monuments and Steve Bannon. Here’s what you need to read to catch up:

From Slate

On Charlottesville: Dahlia Lithwick asserts that the white nationalists who marched on her hometown have been replaced, and collects first-hand accounts of what the “alt-left” was doing on Saturday. Jack Hamilton witnessed the University of Virginia at its best at Wednesday’s stirring vigil.

Isaac Chotiner talks to the New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb about whether we should label neo-Confederates as “Nazis.” Henry Grabar explains that using a car as a weapon has been an ISIS tactic, and had even been previously endorsed by Fox News.

On those monuments: Stonewall Jackson’s great-great-grandsons ask for the removal of his statue: “We are ashamed to benefit from white supremacy while our black family and friends suffer.” Rebecca Onion offers one alternative. Susan Matthews points out the monuments Trump should be supporting instead.

Oh right, it’s Friday: In the latest White House dismissal, Steve Bannon is out. Still, don’t expect much change; Trump himself surely hasn’t taken the opportunity to distance himself from white nationalism. Meanwhile, the editor at his other former employer, Breitbart, hints at #WAR?

Not from Slate

Finally, a Reason to Look Up

With appropriate protection, of course. Monday is eclipse day, when all of North America will witness the most accessible total solar eclipse in nearly a century. Excited observers are setting out for all the small towns along the path of totality, and scientists expect observations could provide a glut of new information about our sun and solar system. You shouldn’t miss out. Forgot to make eclipse-watching plans? (Or procured faulty gear?) We’ve got you.

Thank you for your Slate Plus membership, which helps make our journalism possible.

Chau