Slate's latest podcasts: Can I turn my wedding into a charity fundraiser?

Slate's audio offerings.
July 31 2009 6:50 PM

Slate's Latest Podcasts

Use the audio players below to listen to Slate's daily podcast, which includes articles, the "Political Gabfest," the "Culture Gabfest," and "Money Talks" from The Big Money, or subscribe to the iTunes feed.

July 31, 2009

"The Coalition of the Swilling Gabfest": John Dickerson, Emily Bazelon, and Michael Newman talk politics. This week: disapproval over Obama's plan for health care, racism and beer at the White House, and more on Sonia Sotomayor. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 29, 2009

"I Do Good": Can I turn my wedding into a charity fundraiser? Sandy Stonesifer answers. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 28, 2009

"The Culture Gabfest, The Shrinky Dink Edition": In this week's Culture Gabfest, our critics discuss the arrival of Judd Apatow's third movie, Funny People; the rapid disappearance of the music magazine; and the controversy over some of the new psychological disorders that might be included in the DSM-V. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 27, 2009

"A Man's Home Is His Constitutional Castle": Henry Louis Gates Jr. should have taken his stand on the Bill of Rights, not on his epidermis or that of the arresting officer, says Christopher Hitchens. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 26, 2009

"Who Is Killing America's Millionaires?": According to Daniel Gross, it's not the tax man. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 24, 2009

"The Game-Changer Gabfest": Emily Bazelon, Jacob Weisberg, and James Ledbetter talk politics. This week: President Obama and health care; racism and the Cambridge, Mass., police department; and the stimulus package. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 23, 2009

"Slate Debate: Newspapers vs. the Web": A debate about who's better informed, Web surfers or newspaper readers. Between July 21 and July 23, 2009, Seth Stevenson and Emily Yoffe only consumed Web media, while Timothy Egan and Sam Howe Verhovek read only print newspapers. Michael Kinsley and Michael Newman moderate the debate. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

"Money Talks": The Big Money Editor Jim Ledbetter leads a discussion with Daniel Gross and Marion Maneker on the end of the recession, health care reform, and The Big Money's Obama-inspired stock portfolio. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 22, 2009

"The Culture Gabfest, The Rocket Experience Edition": In this week's Culture Gabfest, our critics discuss the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, New York Times restaurant critic Frank Bruni's struggle with bulimia, and the glut of nominations for the 61st Emmy Awards. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 19, 2009

"Walter Cronkite, 1916-2009":  John Dickerson discusses watching the anchorman in a news family. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 17, 2009

"The Abolish August Gabfest": John Dickerson, Emily Bazelon, and Chris Beam talk politics. This week: Judge Sotomayor makes it through a week of hearings, Health Care moves toward front and center, and Dick Cheney is in the news again. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 16, 2009

"Audio Book Club: Thy Neighbor's Wife, by Gay Talese": Meghan O'Rourke, Katie Roiphe, and Troy Patterson discuss Gay Talese's Thy Neighbor's Wife. We recommend, but don't insist, that you read the book before listening to this audio program. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 15, 2009

"The Culture Gabfest, The In Brüno Veritas Edition": In this week's Culture Gabfest, our critics discuss Brüno, the confrontational new comedy from Sacha Baron Cohen; the links between Goldman Sachs and each of the major financial bubbles of the last 80 years; and a new book on the decline of French food and wine by Slate's Mike Steinberger. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 13, 2009

"State of Fear": State governments are in even more trouble than they seem to be, says Eliot Spitzer. Here's how to save them. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

"Confirmation in 60 Seconds": Dahlia Lithwick tells you everything you need to know about Sonia Sotomayor's upcoming hearings. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 9, 2009

"The New Media Gal Gabfest": John Dickerson, David Plotz, and Emily Bazelon talk politics. This week: Sarah Palin bows out; an Obama round-up; and so-long, salon, at the Washington Post. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

"Money Talks": The Big Money Editor James Ledbetter leads a discussion with Daniel Gross and Marion Maneker on antitrust, the prospect of a second stimulus, and the Japanese economy. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 8, 2009

"The Culture Gabfest, The Smooth Criminal Edition": In this week's Culture Gabfest, our critics discuss the memorial service for Michael Jackson, Michael Mann's new Depression-era bank robber movie, Public Enemies, and the various uses they've found for the Web site UrbanDictionary.com. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 6, 2009

"Hang Up and Listen": Slate's Josh Levin hosts a discussion of recent sports highlights with Mike Pesca of NPR and Stefan Fatsis, author of A Few Seconds of Panic. On the agenda: Sunday's epic Wimbledon final, the return of baseball's Manny Ramirez, and U.S. soccer's surprising winning streak. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 3, 2009

"The Saucy Sarah Gabfest": John Dickerson, David Plotz, and Emily Bazelon talk politics. This week: That's Sen. Franken, if you please; Sarah Palin is back; and the Supreme Court rules on New Haven. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

"Keeping the Fizz in the Journalism Biz": Thanks to technology, Jack Shafer says, journalism may be entering a golden age. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

July 1, 2009

"The Culture Gabfest, The Everybody's Dead Edition": In this week's Culture Gabfest, our critics discuss the recent spate of celebrity deaths, starting with Michael Jackson and the lesser lights—Farrah Fawcett, Ed McMahon, and Billy Mays—eclipsed by his passing, the way obituaries have changed in the internet era, and what makes a good obit. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

June 29, 2009

"Your Money or Your Health": Everyone wants to cut costs. But what if saving my life is expensive? asks Christopher Beam. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

June 28, 2009

"Denver's Secret": Daniel Gross explains why so many green jobs are sprouting in Colorado. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

June 26, 2009

"The Totally Unstable, Lost and Confused Gabfest": John Dickerson, David Plotz, and Emily Bazelon talk politics. This week: President Obama and Iran, South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford, and several decisions from the Supreme Court. To listen to the podcast, click on the audio player below. You can also download the program here.

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