Former chief domestic policy adviser Stuart Eizenstat on the accomplishments of his boss, President Jimmy Carter.

After Watergate, Americans Wanted an Honest President. Until They Got One.

After Watergate, Americans Wanted an Honest President. Until They Got One.

A daily news and culture podcast with Mike Pesca.
Aug. 1 2018 8:31 PM

Quarter for Carter

President Jimmy Carter accepted an investigation into his White House team with grace. Think Trump would do the same?

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A portrait from the White House of Jimmy Carter in 1978.

Karl Schumacher/AFP/Getty Images

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Jimmy Carter’s reputation is that of an ineffective president. But his chief domestic policy adviser, Stuart Eizenstat, argues that Carter fought for America’s energy independence, doubled the size of the national park system, and appointed “more minorities and women to judgeships and senior positions than all 38 presidents before him put together.” Eizenstat’s book is President Carter: The White House Years.

In the Spiel, the local radio scandal of Joe Benigno.

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Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.