The Supreme Court confirmation process is “preposterous.”

Dark Money Is Just as Good for Judicial Candidates

Dark Money Is Just as Good for Judicial Candidates

A daily news and culture podcast with Mike Pesca.
July 3 2018 7:49 PM

Song, Dance, and Confirmation

For all her biases, Amy Coney Barrett could very well survive confirmation to the Supreme Court.

Getty-resized-Supreme-Court-Roe-demonstrator
Volunteers as well as employees of Planned Parenthood demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court on July 8, 2005 in Washington.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Listen to Episode 1027 of Slate’s The Gist:

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On The Gist, let’s watch the latest viral video from the conservative right.

A certain group of Sherlock fans were convinced that John Watson and Sherlock would fall in love. When they didn’t, those fans turned on the showrunners. But what responsibility do creators have to their fans? Should they take suggestions? Slate TV critic Willa Paskin dove into the question—and the Sherlock fan base—on the second episode of Decoder Ring.

In the Spiel, the Supreme Court confirmation process is broken.

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Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.