Harvard law professor Martha Minow on Trump v. Hawaii (and Korematsu v. United States).

America’s Wartime Internment of Japanese Americans Still Provides Legal Precedent

America’s Wartime Internment of Japanese Americans Still Provides Legal Precedent

A daily news and culture podcast with Mike Pesca.
April 25 2018 8:43 PM

Korematsu, Revisited?

As the Supreme Court weighs Trump’s travel ban on Muslim-majority countries, one of its most notorious decisions still stands.

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People gather to protest President Trump’s travel ban in front of the Supreme Court on Wednesday in Washington.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

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On Wednesday’s Gist, you didn’t think Trump’s latest political nominee was scandal-free, did you?

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And as the Supreme Court weighs Trump’s travel ban on Muslim-majority countries, one of its most notorious decisions still stands. Korematsu v. United States upheld America’s wartime internment of thousands of Japanese Americans, and it’s still cited as legal precedent today. Harvard Law School’s Martha Minow recently wrote about the decision and its relevance in 2018.

In the Spiel, president Trump’s approval ratings are highest in West Virginia. Senate candidate (and former convict) Don Blankenship is rolling with it.

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Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.