Princeton’s Betsy Levy Paluck tells us about her research on mass media, genocide, and public opinion.

Popular Opinion Shapes Our Own, and More Than We Might Like

Popular Opinion Shapes Our Own, and More Than We Might Like

A daily news and culture podcast with Mike Pesca.
Jan. 9 2018 7:57 PM

Radio Reconciliation

Rwanda’s radio programming fueled the country’s infamous genocide in 1994. Could it also help it heal?

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An actor reads during the recording of an episode of the soap opera Musekeweya in Kigali, Rwanda, in 2014.

Ayoze O'Shanahan/AFP/Getty Image

Listen to Episode 905 of Slate’s The Gist:

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On The Gist, Joe Arpaio’s life after pardon.

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In the interview, MacArthur “genius” award winner Betsy Levy Paluck tells us about her research into mass media and public opinion. We might have the impression that our beliefs are based on reason. But what our neighbors think (or what we think they think) has a lot to do with it, too.

In the Spiel, the worst of Twitter is on display this week.

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Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.