Author Nancy Isenberg details the history of class identities.

When Did “Redneck” Become a Populist Identity?

When Did “Redneck” Become a Populist Identity?

A daily news and culture podcast with Mike Pesca.
July 20 2016 6:09 PM

Cutting Class

In White Trash, author Nancy Isenberg delves into the history of class identities and our efforts to appropriate or shed them.

160720-thegist-MigrantMotherByLange
Dorothea Lange’s famous 1936 photo, Migrant Mother.

Graphica Artis/Getty Images

Listen to Episode 543 of Slate’s The Gist:

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On The Gist, crackers, rednecks, hillbillies—Nancy Isenberg explains the persistence of these terms and why they can’t be called ethnic identities. Her book is called White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America.

Where’s the Spiel? Check back Thursday morning for another a.m. Spiel on the Republican National Convention.

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Mike Pesca is the host of the Slate daily podcast The Gist. He also contributes reports and commentary to NPR.