The Waves on Sorry to Bother You, the criminalization of motherhood, and the killing of Nia Wilson.

When Parenting Is Policed, Who Gets Punished?

When Parenting Is Policed, Who Gets Punished?

Slate’s weekly women’s roundtable.
Aug. 2 2018 11:11 AM

The #SayHerName Edition

The Waves on Sorry to Bother You, the criminalization of motherhood, and the killing of Nia Wilson.

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Tessa Thompson in Sorry to Bother You.

Annapurna Pictures

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On this week’s episode of the Waves, Christina, Rachelle, and Briahna talk Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You, unpacking the film’s depiction of political demonstrations, the intersection of art and activism, and the arc of Tessa Thompson’s character, Detroit. Then they consider the criminalization of motherhood and the simultaneous rise of the “free-range kids” movement. How do race and class factor into the way parents are perceived and punished? Finally, the hosts discuss Nia Wilson, the recent uptick in violence against women and marginalized communities, and who’s allowed to be a victim. How likely is it that the man who killed her will be charged with a hate crime, and how much does it matter if he is?

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Other items discussed on the show:

Recommendations:

This podcast was produced by Danielle Hewitt. Our production assistant is Alex Barasch.

The Waves plugs: Please remember to like our Facebook page. Send your emails to thewaves@slate.com. Tell us what we should cover in the next episode.

Christina Cauterucci is a Slate staff writer.

Briahna Joy Gray is senior politics editor at the Intercept, contributing editor at Current Affairs, and co-host of the podcast SWOTI, or Someone’s Wrong on the Internet.

Rachelle Hampton is a Slate editorial assistant.