War for the Planet of the Apes, Okja’s ethics, and comedy in the Trump era, on the Culture Gabfest.

Maybe the Apes Should Be in Charge

Maybe the Apes Should Be in Charge

Slate's weekly roundtable.
July 26 2017 10:27 AM

The Culture Gabfest “Apes, Pigs, and Comedians” Edition

Slate’s Culture Gabfest on War for the Planet of the Apes, Okja and the ethics of eating meat, and comedy in the age of Trump.

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Listen to Culture Gabfest No. 462 with Jamelle Bouie, Stephen Metcalf, and Dana Stevens with the audio player below.

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On this week’s Slate Plus extra, Dana, Jamelle, and Stephen talk about the controversy surrounding the newly announced HBO series Confederate, which takes place in an alternate history in which the South won the Civil War. Go to slate.com/cultureplus to learn more about Slate Plus and join today.

On this week’s Slate Culture Gabfest, the critics discuss War for the Planet of the Apes, the third installment of the latest Apes trilogy featuring stellar motion-capture work from Andy Serkis. Next, they talk about Okja, a film about a genetically modified “superpig,” and debate the ethics of eating meat from intelligent creatures like pigs. Finally, the gabbers dive into Andrew Kahn’s new piece in Slate about the state of satire in the age of Trump and how comedy can survive in these times.

Links to some of the things we discussed this week:

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Endorsements

Dana: “Why Procrastinators Procrastinate” by Tim Urban on Wait but Why

Jamelle: The 39 Steps

Stephen: The Big Sick and the The Best of John Doe: This Far by John Doe

Outro: “A Little Help” by John Doe

You can email us at culturefest@slate.com.

This podcast was produced by Benjamin Frisch. Our intern is Daniel Schroeder.

Follow us on Twitter. And please like the Culture Gabfest on Facebook.

Jamelle Bouie is Slates chief political correspondent.

Stephen Metcalf is Slate’s critic at large. He is working on a book about the 1980s.

Dana Stevens is Slate’s movie critic.