Slate’s Culture Gabfest discusses what late-night comedy will be like under a Trump presidency.

Will Late-Night Shows Help Us Laugh Through a Trump Presidency? (And Should They?)

Will Late-Night Shows Help Us Laugh Through a Trump Presidency? (And Should They?)

Slate's weekly roundtable.
Nov. 17 2016 2:26 PM

Will Late-Night Shows Help Us Laugh Through a Trump Presidency?

Maybe. Here’s what Slate’s Culture Gabfest thinks about the shifting role of comedy.

Taraji P Henson Visits "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon" at Rockefeller Center on October 10, 2016 in New York City.
Taraji P. Henson visits The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallonin New York City on Oct. 10.

Theo Wargo/Getty Images

In the Slate Plus bonus segment of Wednesday’s edition of the Culture Gabfest, hosts Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, and Julia Turner chat with Slate chief political correspondent Jamelle Bouie about the future of late-night comedy.

In the past year, late-night hosts had more material than they knew what to do with. But now that we’re looking at a Trump presidency, will we ever laugh again?

Advertisement

What’s comedy’s new role in this moment of political calamity? Why hasn’t Stephen been in the mood to laugh over late-night comedy shows? And what did Julia think about Kate McKinnon’s controversial performance of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah?”

Get more of the Culture Gabfest!

Sign up for Slate Plus to hear this bonus segment, and you’ll get the extended, ad-free version every week.

Your Culture Gabfest podcast feed

Copy this link and manually import it into your podcast app:

For full instructions see the Slate Plus podcasts FAQ.

Jamelle Bouie is Slates chief political correspondent.

Stephen Metcalf is Slate’s critic at large. He is working on a book about the 1980s.

Dana Stevens is Slate’s movie critic.

Julia Turner is the editor in chief of Slate and a regular on Slate’s Culture Gabfest podcast.