Slate’s Culture Gabfest on Foxcatcher, Sleater-Kinney’s album No Cities to Love, and the 2015 Super Bowl ads.

Why Were the Super Bowl Ads Full of Somber, Weepy Dads?

Why Were the Super Bowl Ads Full of Somber, Weepy Dads?

Slate's weekly roundtable.
Feb. 4 2015 10:50 AM

The Culture Gabfest “Nice Singlet!” Edition

Slate’s Culture Gabfest on Foxcatcher, Sleater-Kinney’s album No Cities to Love, and the 2015 Super Bowl ads.

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Listen to Culture Gabfest No. 333 with Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, and Julia Turner with the audio player below.

And join the lively conversation on the Culturefest Facebook page here:

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This week on the Slate Culture Gabfest, the critics wrestle with the central theme of Bennett Miller’s elusive Oscar contender Foxcatcher. Next up, Slate’s pop critic Jack Hamilton joins to discuss Sleater-Kinney’s new album No Cities to Love. After a 10-year hiatus, does this legendary band still rock? Finally, Slate contributor Seth Stevenson talks to the critics about the Super Bowl. Why was 2015 the year of the bleakest ads of all time?

Links to some of the things we discussed this week follow:

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Endorsements:

Dana: “Lewis Carroll and the Hunting of the Snark” by Edward Wakeling on the Public Domain Review blog

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Steve: George Orwell’s essay about Charles Dickens in the edited collection All Art Is Propaganda

Outro: “My Girl” by the Temptations

You can email us at culturefest@slate.com.

This podcast was produced by Ann Heppermann. Our intern is Lindsey Albracht.

Follow us on Twitter. And please Like the Culture Gabfest on Facebook.

Stephen Metcalf is Slate’s critic at large. He is working on a book about the 1980s.

Dana Stevens is Slate’s movie critic.

Julia Turner is the editor in chief of Slate and a regular on Slate’s Culture Gabfest podcast.