Slate’s Culture Gabfest on the Lost Art of Handwriting, Gay Resistance to Marriage, and Neomania

Slate's weekly roundtable.
Dec. 5 2012 12:36 PM

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Slate's podcast about gay people who don’t want to get married, the lost art of handwriting, and Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s take on “neomania.”

Listen to Culture Gabfest No. 220 with Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, June Thomas, and Julia Turner by clicking the arrow on the audio player below:

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Culturefest is on the radio! “Gabfest Radio” combines Slate’s Culture and Political Gabfests in one show—listen on Saturdays at 7 a.m. and Sundays at 6 p.m. on WNYC’s AM820.

On this week’s Culture Gabfest, our critics discuss the end of handwriting and Philip Hensher's book The Missing Ink, Nassim Nicholas Taleb's book Antifragile and the idea of "neomania," and Slate's June Thomas stops by to explain why she neither wants a wife, nor wants to be one.

Here are some links to the things we discussed this week:

Dana’s endorsements:

Elliott Holt Twitter fiction and BBC’s Start the Week podcast on the art of handwriting

Julia’s endorsement:

Steve’s endorsement:

Outtro song: “Living in the Future” by John Prine

You can email us at culturefest@slate.com.

This podcast was produced by Dan Pashman. Our intern is Sally Tamarkin.

Follow us on the new Culturefest Twitter feed. And please Like the Culture Gabfest on Facebook.

Stephen Metcalf is Slate's critic at large. He is working on a book about the 1980s.

Dana Stevens is Slate's movie critic.

June Thomas is a Slate culture critic and editor of Outward, Slate’s LGBTQ section. 

Julia Turner is the editor in chief of Slate and a regular on Slate's Culture Gabfest podcast.

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