The original Manchurian Candidate and the 2004 remake reflect the politics of their times.

The Manchurian Candidate Began Life as a Lurid Cold War Satire. That’s Not How It Plays Today.

The Manchurian Candidate Began Life as a Lurid Cold War Satire. That’s Not How It Plays Today.

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May 23 2017 4:57 PM
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Conspiracy Thrillers Movie Club: The Manchurian Candidate

In this first episode, Sam Adams and writer Mark Harris on a story of war, politics, and brainwashing.

Photo illustration by Slate. Stills from MGM/UA Home Video and Warner Home Video.

Photo illustration by Slate. Stills from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

To learn more about and join Slate’s Conspiracy Thrillers Movie Club, visit Slate.com/thrillers.

In this first episode of Slate’s Conspiracy Thrillers Movie Club, Sam Adams talks with Mark Harris, journalist and author of Five Came Back, about The Manchurian Candidate, a tale of brainwashing, war, and politics that first made it on screen in 1962 and was then remade in 2004, with each reflecting the crises of its time.