Political gerrymandering and the 2017 Supreme Court term.

Why Voting Rights Advocates Are on Edge About the Coming Supreme Court Term

Why Voting Rights Advocates Are on Edge About the Coming Supreme Court Term

Law and the Supreme Court justices who interpret it.
Sept. 16 2017 10:00 AM

Gerrymandering Goes Back to Court

As is so often the case, all eyes are on Justice Anthony Kennedy.

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Listen to Episode 72 of Slate’s Amicus:

When the Supreme Court term opens next month, perhaps no issue will be more urgent—and more complicated—than voting rights. One of the first cases the justices will hear is Gill v. Whitford, a challenge to the 2011 redrawing of district lines in Wisconsin. While the court has struck down racially motivated gerrymanders in the past, no election map has ever been rejected as a purely partisan gerrymander. And recent developments have some court watchers concerned that Justice Anthony Kennedy may still not be ready to do that.

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Our guest this episode is Richard Hasen, Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of California, Irvine, and curator of the must-read Election Law Blog.

Please let us know what you think of Amicus. Join the discussion of this episode on Facebook. Our email is amicus@slate.com.

Podcast production by Tony Field.

Dahlia Lithwick writes about the courts and the law for Slate and hosts the podcast Amicus.