What's really happening in Washington this week.

A political calendar.
April 10 2006 6:23 AM

Libby Answers the Fitzgerald Bombshell

What's really happening in Washington this week.

Monday

Maybe we can deport Congress instead: Latinos are planning the biggest-ever nationwide rally of immigrants today, a 60-city extravaganza that leaders claim will attract millions of participants. Their target: efforts by Congress to restrict immigration.

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But the demonstrators might be giving lawmakers a bit too much credit. Congress, failing last week to pass immigration legislation, a budget, or much of anything else, goes on yet another vacation, this one a two-week Easter recess. After a tentative agreement on an immigration bill collapsed Friday in the Senate, the matter is heading back to the judiciary committee's drawing board.

Tom DeLay is looking for work: And George Washington University may have just the thing. It sponsors a discussion titled, "Why Be a Lobbyist Today?" featuring, among others, representatives from Wiley Rein & Fielding and Akin Gump Strauss Hauer and Feld.

Tuesday

Race to the bottom: The latest Washington Post/ABC News poll comes out Tuesday, giving the first measure of public opinion since news broke that indicted former White House official Scooter Libby testified that President Bush authorized leaks of classified information. Last month's Post poll put Bush's support at 41 percent. An Associated Press/Ipsos poll out last Friday had him at a record-low of 36 percent.

Check out the Willie Mays memorabilia: The nation's newest tourist attraction, George W. Bush's boyhood home, opens in Midland, Texas. The first lady and the president's parents will be on hand to cut a ribbon and reminisce at 1412 West Ohio Ave.

The vice president, meanwhile, throws out the first pitch at the Washington Nationals' home opener. The pressing question: Will he take the mound and do the full windup, as President Bush does, or will he make a wimpy toss from the stands like William Howard Taft?

The forgotten upper class: Hillary Clinton gives her first major economic speech as a proto-presidential candidate. Her venue: the annual black-tie dinner meeting of the Economic Club of Chicago. Don't expect a lot of fiery populist rhetoric from the New York senator; she doesn't want her hosts busting their cummerbunds or fainting in their foie gras. Bush once referred to a similarly attired crowd as his base: "The haves and the have mores."

Wednesday