What's really happening in Washington this week.

A political calendar.
March 6 2006 7:44 AM

Tim Russert, Horse's Hindquarters?

What's really happening in Washington this week.

Monday

Iran: This time we (might) really mean it: The biggest event in Washington today will actually take place in Austria, where the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency weighs in on Iran's nuclear program, which will then be taken up by the U.N. Security Council. Because Iran failed to reach agreement last week in last-minute talks with Russia and the European Union, Mohamed ElBaradei, the IAEA's chief, will issue a bad report card to Iran Monday. While the Bush administration continues to insist that diplomacy is the remedy for Iran's disobedience, some hawks are getting itchy. On Tuesday, the Hudson Institute hosts a forum with the former chief of the Israel Defense Forces titled "Stopping the Iranian Nuclear Program: Is There an Israeli Option?" Wednesday, the Heritage Foundation hosts a talk titled "Iranian Support for Terrorism: The Shadow War."

Advertisement

And what are you looking at, Hamas? The powerful America Israel Public Affairs Committee holds its annual policy conference in Washington, and Hamas is on its mind. A priority of this year's session is passage of legislation banning direct aid and prohibiting indirect aid to the Palestinian Authority until Hamas, which now controls the government, abandons terrorism. As usual, AIPAC plays host to pandering leaders of both parties. Monday morning, new House Majority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) and aspiring Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards (N.C.) make their pitches. Monday night, Sen. Even Bayh (Ind.), another Democratic would-be president, and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) pay homage. It's Vice President Cheney's turn Tuesday morning, along with House Majority Whip Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) and Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.). Absent this year: Israeli politicians, who, because of the election campaign at home, will address AIPAC via satellite. Present this year: The DC Anti-War Network, which plans to picket on behalf of the Palestinians and Iranians in a demonstration Monday evening.

Tuesday

The DeLay primary: The fallen House majority leader, now an indicted backbencher, faces three challengers for his Houston-area congressional seat in Tuesday's Republican primary. DeLay is forecast to best his foes: Tom Campbell, Michael Fjetland, and Pat Baig. Less certain is if he can get the 50 percent needed to avoid a runoff. Then DeLay has to worry about former Congressman Nick Lampson, his well-funded Democratic challenger, in the fall.

Libertarians, out but not down: With the Bush administration vastly expanding the size of government and engaging in warrantless surveillance of some U.S. citizens, the libertarian wing of the Republican Party Bush once scolded as "leave us alone" conservatives has been in retreat. But on Tuesday, the libertarian Cato Institute takes a measure of revenge. It hosts a book discussion with Bruce Bartlett, author of Impostor: How George Bush Bankrupted America and Betrayed the Reagan Legacy. Also speaking: Andrew Sullivan, author of The Conservative Soul: How We Lost It; How To Get it Back.

Wednesday

Returning to the crime scene: Bush pays yet another visit to the Katrina-ravaged South. The hurricane last summer sent his presidency into a tailspin from which, as last week's polls showed, it has not emerged. Expect coverage of Bush's trip to New Orleans and Gulfport, Miss., to be spattered with references to last week's appearance of a pre-storm video in which Bush was warned about the New Orleans levees and the potential problems with the Superdome. Back in Washington, meanwhile, the endless Katrina hearings continue. The Senate appropriations committee spends two days inspecting Bush's latest spending request for hurricane recovery. And the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. on Wednesday examines "Hurricane Katrina: Recommendations for Reform."

Flat taxation without representation: The Senate's D.C. appropriations subcommittee holds a hearing "on the potential effects of a flat federal income tax in the District of Columbia."

Thursday

TODAY IN SLATE

Politics

The Irritating Confidante

John Dickerson on Ben Bradlee’s fascinating relationship with John F. Kennedy.

My Father Invented Social Networking at a Girls’ Reform School in the 1930s

Renée Zellweger’s New Face Is Too Real

Sleater-Kinney Was Once America’s Best Rock Band

Can it be again?

The All The President’s Men Scene That Captured Ben Bradlee

Culturebox

The Simpsons World App Is Finally Here

I feel like a kid in some kind of store.

Technology

Driving in Circles

The autonomous Google car may never actually happen.

The Difference Between Being a Hero and an Altruist

How Punctual Are Germans?

  News & Politics
Politics
Oct. 22 2014 12:44 AM We Need More Ben Bradlees His relationship with John F. Kennedy shows what’s missing from today’s Washington journalism.
  Business
Moneybox
Oct. 21 2014 5:57 PM Soda and Fries Have Lost Their Charm for Both Consumers and Investors
  Life
Quora
Oct. 22 2014 9:51 AM What Was It Like to Work at NASA During the Challenger and Columbia Disasters?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Oct. 22 2014 10:00 AM On the Internet, Men Are Called Names. Women Are Stalked and Sexually Harassed.
  Slate Plus
Working
Oct. 22 2014 6:00 AM Why It’s OK to Ask People What They Do David Plotz talks to two junior staffers about the lessons of Working.
  Arts
Culturebox
Oct. 22 2014 9:54 AM The Simpsons World App Is Finally Here I feel like a kid in some kind of store.
  Technology
Future Tense
Oct. 22 2014 8:43 AM Thunderstruck: Rock Out With Mother Nature’s Evil Side
  Health & Science
Wild Things
Oct. 22 2014 9:39 AM Gertjie and Lammie, a Magical (and Bizarre) Friendship
  Sports
Sports Nut
Oct. 20 2014 5:09 PM Keepaway, on Three. Ready—Break! On his record-breaking touchdown pass, Peyton Manning couldn’t even leave the celebration to chance.