First Enron, Now End Run?

A summary of what's in the major U.S. newspapers.
Oct. 29 2006 5:48 AM

First Enron, Now End Run?

(Continued from Page 1)

The NYT's Alessandra Stanley offers her critique of the season's political ads, focusing on the trend of injecting humor into TV spots. She notes the influence of Jon Stewart and YouTube and highlights a few examples, including one mock anti-Ned Lamont ad that accuses him of being a bad coffee maker and having a messy desk.

By the way, the NYT endorsed Lamont today over Joe Lieberman, as it did in the Democratic primary.

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Apart from politics, the NYT fronts a bleak feature on child labor in Africa, explaining how kids in the central and western regions of the continent are sold to fishermen and farmers to work. The story describes how some are beaten regularly and the long, grueling hours they work. Several children are interviewed, including one as young as 6, and their tales are heartbreaking. A photo of the 6-year-old bailing water out of a fishing boat—his job—is on the paper's front page. There's also an audio feature on the website.

The LAT notes proposed changes in citizenship policies, pointing out a possible doubling of application fees and a potential mandatory online process that critics say will prevent many immigrants from applying. There would also be a simple form to fill out when registering for an online account—only 19 pages long.

Be sure not to miss the NYT's front pager on condoms and foreign aid, which includes this description: "Inside a modern, low-slung building owned by Alatech Healthcare, ingenious contraptions almost as long as a football field repeatedly dip 16,000 phallic-shaped bulbs into vats of latex, with the capacity to turn out a billion condoms a year." Whew.

For those who care, Michael Lewis may or may not be previewing his next book in the NYT's Play magazine with a profile of Bill Parcells, while the WP warns Google that teenagers are fickle.

And former Celtics coach Red Auerbach is dead. He is believed to have lit a stogie just before entering the Pearly Gates.

Correction, Oct. 30: This "Today's Papers" originally asked, regarding corporations' desire to change regulatory rules, "Why so soon after the new Congress takes office?" However, since the Congress will not be sworn in until January, we have made a clarifying adjustment. (Return to the corrected sentence.)

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