Ayaan's American Enterprise

The latest chatter in cyberspace.
May 15 2006 6:48 PM

Ayaan's American Enterprise

Some bloggers are thrilled at the news that controversial Dutch politician Ayaan Hirsi Ali is moving to the United States; others are pondering the Bush administration's decision to renew diplomatic ties with Libya or poring over a New York Times list of the best works of modern American fiction.

Ayaan's American Enterprise: Dutch parliamentarian Ayaan Hirsi Ali has accepted a position at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C. A Somali Muslim who became a fervent critic of her religion after being granted asylum in the Netherlands, Hirsi Ali has been pilloried  in recent weeks by her own anti-immigration party, the VVD, for lying in her asylum application.

Many conservatives insist that it doesn't matter that she fudged her asylum application.

Advertisement

At Hot Air, the conservative network launched by Michelle Malkin, Allahpundit writes, "Hirsi Ali is arguably the greatest champion of western values on the international scene right now; in refusing to tolerate Islamist intolerance, she's … doing a job Europeans won't do. Call it 'earned citizenship.' " Combs Spout Off's R.G. Combs points out that Ali had disclosed that she'd lied on her asylum application in 2002, when she was running for office. Liberty and Justice's Michael Galien, a Dutch student member of Ali's party, criticizes a recently aired documentary that sparked scrutiny of Ali's asylum status and bemoans, "She will be welcomed into the US and she will get the respect she deserves there, but it is a crying shame that we force people like her to leave our country."

But right-leaning blog Riehl World View demurs: "If Ali wasn't under specific threat and was just like millions of others who didn't qualify for asylum at the time, she manipulated the system by breaking the law. Aren't conservatives supposed to be against that, particularly when it comes to immigration?"

DailyKos diarist Dearkitty, who lives in the Netherlands, slams Ali, claiming she's been "exposed as a fake," and that the AEI is "one of the most prominent pro Bush pro war neocon spin factories in the USA."

On Reason's blog Hit & Run, David Weigel provides some perspective: "Under different circumstances this would have been a survivable scandal. But Hirsi Ali's party, the Volkspartij voor Vrijheid en Democratie, has a draconian stance on illegal immigration which includes deportation for anyone who lies in their citizenship or asylum applications. The irony is delighting Hirsi Ali's enemies - it might give pause to Dutch politicians who have swung wildly to the right on immigration policy." He also links to this Guardian profile of Ali.

Read more about Ayaan Hirsi Ali. ViewSubmission, the film she wrote—and that led to the death of Theo van Gogh—about how Islam affects women. Christopher Hitchens recently decried the Netherlands' treatment of Hirsi Ali in Slate.

Ob-Libya-gations: Citing Libya's willingness to give up WMD and its cooperation in anti-terrorism efforts, the United States is rekindling diplomatic ties with Libya after 25 years.

Some welcome the gesture. RussBlog's libertarian-leaning Russel Newquist calls it "a really brilliant move against Iran. It casts the US in a good light globally, by allowing us to say, 'See, we're more than capable of making nice with an Islamic nation that denounces terror and decides it doesn't need to intimidate its neighbors with nuclear weapons, even though we've had problems with that country (and even its current leader!) for a quarter of a century.' " Ninth State's conservative Alex Athans agrees but asks, "[W]ill this country have the testicular fortitude to again revoke diplomatic and trade relations with Libya should that country resume terrorist activities?"

TODAY IN SLATE

History

Slate Plus Early Read: The Self-Made Man

The story of America’s most pliable, pernicious, irrepressible myth.

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada. Now, Journalists Can’t Even Say Her Name.

Mitt Romney May Be Weighing a 2016 Run. That Would Be a Big Mistake.

Amazing Photos From Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution

Transparent Is the Fall’s Only Great New Show

The XX Factor

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada

Now, journalists can't even say her name.

Doublex

Lena Dunham, the Book

More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.

What a Juicy New Book About Diane Sawyer and Katie Couric Fails to Tell Us About the TV News Business

Does Your Child Have Sluggish Cognitive Tempo? Or Is That Just a Disorder Made Up to Scare You?

  News & Politics
History
Sept. 29 2014 11:45 PM The Self-Made Man The story of America’s most pliable, pernicious, irrepressible myth.
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 29 2014 7:01 PM We May Never Know If Larry Ellison Flew a Fighter Jet Under the Golden Gate Bridge
  Life
Dear Prudence
Sept. 30 2014 6:00 AM Drive-By Bounty Prudie advises a woman whose boyfriend demands she flash truckers on the highway.
  Double X
Doublex
Sept. 29 2014 11:43 PM Lena Dunham, the Book More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.
  Slate Plus
Slate Fare
Sept. 29 2014 8:45 AM Slate Isn’t Too Liberal, but … What readers said about the magazine’s bias and balance.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 29 2014 9:06 PM Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice Looks Like a Comic Masterpiece
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 30 2014 7:36 AM Almost Humane What sci-fi can teach us about our treatment of prisoners of war.
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 30 2014 7:30 AM What Lurks Beneath The Methane Lakes of Titan?
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 28 2014 8:30 PM NFL Players Die Young. Or Maybe They Live Long Lives. Why it’s so hard to pin down the effects of football on players’ lives.