How baseball can usher out the A-Roid era.

Notes from the political sidelines.
Feb. 11 2009 7:44 PM

Straight Change We Can Believe In

How baseball can usher out the A-Roid era.

Alex Rodriguez strikes out. Click image to expand.
Alex Rodriguez

In spite of itself, baseball remains the national pastime so it's only fitting that with America mired in crisis, the game would find a way to do the same. Alex Rodriguez's belated confession that he used steroids from 2001 to 2003, along with Miguel Tejada's guilty plea for lying to Congress about an ex-teammate * and Barry Bonds' upcoming trial for perjury, has brought Major League Baseball to the tipping point. Almost 100 years ago, a renegade group of baseball owners launched the short-lived Federal League. Soon, it will be possible to do that again, and sell the naming rights to the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

As Tim Marchman points out, no one is shedding any tears for A-Rod, whose career earnings of around $1 million for each forevermore-in-doubt home run make him one of the highest-paid liars in American history. But as William Saletan explains, A-Rod is just the tip of the juiceberg: In 2003, 103 players failed the same test as he did. That's one out of every eight players, or about three per franchise. Baseball now must confront a Wall Street-size systemic failure: What do you do with everybody when it turns out that, in fact, everybody did it?

Advertisement

Both baseball owners (who looked the other way through the A-Roid era) and the players' union (which covered for it) will be tempted to ride out the current storm, confident that the long-term fundamentals of the game are sound. They don't know how much the economic downturn will hurt their bottom line, but the past few years have brought record attendance, strong profits, eye-popping salaries, and plenty of genuine excitement.

But with the revelation that at least one-eighth of its players and most of its marquee stars were (and might still be) faking it, the World Series now looks more like World Wrestling Entertainment. Once the 103 names of A-Rod's fellow failures become knownalong with countless others bound to emerge in the Bonds trial and inevitable congressional investigationsmajor league rosters will resemble the balance sheets of major banks. The Yankees have A-Rod on contract for the next nine years, and no matter how often he apologizes, he'll still be the sporting world's biggest toxic asset.

Without a sharp break in its culture, baseball risks becoming the American equivalent of the Tour de France, a beautiful sport no longer trusted to be on the level. As a prominent White Sox fan might say, baseball needs change we can believe in.

To clean up its act, Major League Baseball must adapt a strategy of shock and awe, instead of surprise and denial:

First, the league needs to change the culture of baseball by punishing steroid use as a team crime, not just an individual one. When the NCAA finds major violations involving a college player, the player isn't the only one to face sanctions; the college can be ruled ineligible for post-season play. Major League Baseball should apply the same principle to steroid use: If a player tests positive, the player will be suspended for the seasonand the team will be barred from taking part in the playoffs or the World Series.

After Rodriguez's confession, Rangers team owner Tom Hicks said he felt "betrayed" by A-Rod's actions, and the Yankees no doubt feel the same way. No matter how genuine those feelings, let's face it: The culture of baseball rewarded everyonethe commissioner, owners, managers, players, sportswriters, fansfor looking the other way. That culture will change in a hurry if everyone in the system has everything to lose by looking the other way.

Second, to stop its currency from being permanently devalued, baseball needs to save the Hall of Fame for heroes. For more than 100 years, baseball has been one long friendly argument about statisticswhich ones mattered most and which players, teams, and eras measured up best. Thanks to steroids, the game is now an experiment with a decade or more of bad data. The sabermetricians can't even tell us how much of Barry Bonds' head size is real, let alone how many of his 762 home runs would have cleared the fence in any other era.

Major League Baseball can't rewrite the box scores from those years. The only standard it can hold onto is the Baseball Hall of Fame, its pantheon of heroes for the ages. The Hall of Fame will never be perfect: Some mediocrities have snuck in over the years, and some players who've been left out were more deserving. But to fans, it still means something, and it means the world to players. Pete Rose was banned from consideration for gambling on his own team and has spent the past 20 years trying to get in.

TODAY IN SLATE

Politics

The Irritating Confidante

John Dickerson on Ben Bradlee’s fascinating relationship with John F. Kennedy.

My Father Invented Social Networking at a Girls’ Reform School in the 1930s

Renée Zellweger’s New Face Is Too Real

Sleater-Kinney Was Once America’s Best Rock Band

Can it be again?

The All The President’s Men Scene That Captured Ben Bradlee

Culturebox

The Simpsons World App Is Finally Here

I feel like a kid in some kind of store.

Technology

Driving in Circles

The autonomous Google car may never actually happen.

The Difference Between Being a Hero and an Altruist

How Punctual Are Germans?

  News & Politics
Politics
Oct. 22 2014 12:44 AM We Need More Ben Bradlees His relationship with John F. Kennedy shows what’s missing from today’s Washington journalism.
  Business
Moneybox
Oct. 21 2014 5:57 PM Soda and Fries Have Lost Their Charm for Both Consumers and Investors
  Life
Outward
Oct. 22 2014 10:37 AM Judge Upholds Puerto Rico’s Gay Marriage Ban in a Comically Inane Opinion
  Double X
The XX Factor
Oct. 22 2014 10:00 AM On the Internet, Men Are Called Names. Women Are Stalked and Sexually Harassed.
  Slate Plus
Working
Oct. 22 2014 6:00 AM Why It’s OK to Ask People What They Do David Plotz talks to two junior staffers about the lessons of Working.
  Arts
Culturebox
Oct. 22 2014 9:54 AM The Simpsons World App Is Finally Here I feel like a kid in some kind of store.
  Technology
Technology
Oct. 22 2014 10:29 AM Apple TV Could Still Work Here’s how Apple can fix its living-room product.
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Oct. 22 2014 10:30 AM Monster Sunspot Will Make Thursday’s Eclipse That Much Cooler
  Sports
Sports Nut
Oct. 20 2014 5:09 PM Keepaway, on Three. Ready—Break! On his record-breaking touchdown pass, Peyton Manning couldn’t even leave the celebration to chance.