Fear of appeasement is paralyzing diplomacy, where to start with Rick and Morty, and Fox & Friends’ influence, in Slate’s daily newsletter.

“Appeasement,” Rick and Morty, and Fox & Friends

“Appeasement,” Rick and Morty, and Fox & Friends

Sharp takes on big stories.
Oct. 16 2017 6:05 PM

The Angle: Peppy Brew Edition

Slate’s daily newsletter on “appeasement,” Rick and Morty, and Fox & Friends.

Donald-Trump-Names-Fox-And-Friends-As-One-Of-His-Favorite-Broadcasts
Hosts Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt, and Brian Kilmeade broadcast Fox & Friends on Feb. 17 in New York City.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Signing on: Justin Peters is going to watch Fox News and blog about it for Slate. He started his series by immersing himself in a certain early rising president’s favorite morning show, Fox & Friends: a potent blend of bad faith, cheerful banality, and “pettiness of spirit” all delivered before most people commute. 

Rebecca Onion Rebecca Onion

Rebecca Onion is a Slate staff writer and the author of Innocent Experiments

Not 1938: The specter of Munich means that we all must live with people calling “appeasement!” at attempts to negotiate with leaders like Kim Jong-un. That stigma is dangerous, Franz-Stefan Gady writes.

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Whatever happened to ... : Why don't people invoke “big data” with excitement anymore? In a piece kicking off our new series on the subject, Will Oremus outlines the term’s recent demise and suggests some possible futures for algorithms and analytics.

Handy: Everyone [millennial and nerdish] loves Rick and Morty. Want to try it? Isaac Butler recommends an icebreaker episode and issues some caveats.

Eeee,

Rebecca