Slate's Summer Movies issue.

The joy of blockbusters.
July 7 2009 7:04 AM

Slate's Summer Movies Issue III

It's a sequel, but we promise it's good.

Illustration by Alex Eben Meyer. Click image to expand.

The sun is shining, the beaches are teeming, the Pop-Ice is in the freezer, and Sacha Baron Cohen's lawyers have been pulling all-nighters. It's time, in other words, for another edition of Slate's Summer Movies issue. This year, we explore the history of blowing up national landmarks on film, compile the zaniest escapes from mortal peril in the original G.I. Joe cartoon, offer tips on how not to adopt a demon child, ask stunt men what their favorite movies are, and complain about the indignities of watching movies outdoors. And the best part of it all? You don't even have to turn off your cell phone to enjoy the show. (In fact, you can read the issue on your cell phone at Slate's new mobile site.) So fire up a tub of popcorn, salt it to your liking, and start surfing.

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

"Why Don't Movies Ever Blow Up the Bay Bridge? A history of destroying national landmarks on film," by Keith Phipps.

"Minor Threat: Why are we so fascinated with horror movies about homicidal children?" by Jonah Weiner.

" 'That Was Way Too Close!' Wonderfully absurd escapes from mortal danger in the original G.I. Joe cartoon," by Adrian Chen.

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Monday, July 6, 2009



"Let's Go See a Movie in the Park!: I've got a better idea: Let's not," by Juliet Lapidos. Posted July 6, 2009.

"Best Weekend Never: Why journalists don't account for inflation when they report box office records," by Zachary Pincus-Roth. Posted July 6, 2009.

"The King of All Formulas: The incredible true story of the man who invented the Hollywood schlock machine," by Paul Collins. Posted July 6, 2009.

"The Blockbusters of China: Chinese people watch good movies in which people shoot one another with crossbows, not the miserable art-house fare that gets exported," by Grady Hendrix. Posted July 6, 2009.

"That Was Awesome: What stuntmen think are the best stunt films of all time," by Kevin Conley. Posted July 6, 2009.

Thursday, July 2, 2009

" He-Man and the Infinite Sadness: And other genius responses to Slate's create-your-own-toy-movie contest," by Dana Stevens.

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