Everything about Slate's 10th anniversary.

June 1996 - June 2006.
June 23 2006 7:47 AM

Slate's 10th Anniversary

Celebrating our first decade with some of our all-time favorite articles, lots of self-congratulation, and a few sharp critiques.

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"Hitler Slept Here: The too-secret history of the Third Reich's most famous place," by Scott Shuger and Donald Berger. Originally published April 13, 2001.

"Hello, Moon: Has America's low-rise obsession gone too far?" by Amanda Fortini. Originally published Feb. 11, 2005.

"An Unlikely Hero: The Marine who found two WTC survivors," by Rebecca Liss. Originally published Sept. 10, 2002.

"O'Reilly Among the Snobs: It takes one to know one," by Michael Kinsley. Originally published March 2, 2001.

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"The Misunderestimated Man: How Bush chose stupidity," by Jacob Weisberg. Originally published May 7, 2004.

"TV's Aryan Sisterhood: They know only one hair color—blonder!" by Jack Shafer. Originally published Feb. 21, 2006.

"How Good Is the Washington Monument: Our critic takes a walk through the Washington Mall," by Witold Rybczynski. Originally published Dec. 7, 2005.

"Extroverted Like Me: How a month and a half on Paxil taught me to love being shy," by Seth Stevenson. Originally published Jan. 2, 2001.

"Watching the Couples Go By: Why is this basic woman so valuable to this basic man whose arm she holds?" By Herbert Stein. Originally published June 13, 1997.



"What Is Torture? An interactive primer on American interrogation," by Emily Bazelon, Phillip Carter, and Dahlia Lithwick. Originally published May 26, 2005.



"Cogito Auto Sum: What less can we say? Computers have the answer," by Karenna Gore. Originally published Feb. 9, 1997.

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