Meet Slate’s Newest Writer, Boer Deng

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May 1 2014 9:02 AM
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Meet Boer Deng

One surprising thing about the Slate politics team’s new editorial assistant.

“In grand Slate tradition, tell us a little bit about yourself.”

Boer Deng Boer Deng

Boer Deng is a Slate editorial assistant. Follow her on Twitter

That’s the invitation that concludes every email announcement of a new Slate hire. Here’s what new editorial assistant Boer Deng had to say.

We also asked Boer to suggest a few sites that are essential to the work she does in support of Slate’s political coverage. Here are four links that Boer reads every day.

Aeon magazine: “This digital magazine always has smart, affecting long-form essays I very much enjoy. They cover a lot of issues in science well, which is hard to do. Their scope is wide, and they will often have things that are surprising yet germane for me. One of my favorite writers they regularly publish is James Palmer. He writes about China and, often, the changes facing young Chinese today. I particularly liked his story ‘The Balinghou’ from a little while ago.” 

The Economist:  “Full disclosure: I worked for them before coming to Slate and still contribute occasionally. But truly, it is full of journalists I admire. David Rennie is the Lexington columnist (and was my boss) and manages to do such a terrific piece about American politics every week. My favorite, though, is that every year in the Christmas issue they print these long, fun stories. This one, in which David goes bow-hunting in Wisconsin, is thoroughly enjoyable and insightful.”

Interfluidity: “My favorite economics blog. You learn so much just from reading the discussion in the comments. And the way Steve Randy Waldman writes, when he observes an economic phenomenon, it makes you think, Wow, that’s exactly right! There’s a post about wealth as insurance that I found very perspicacious and still remember, though it was written some time ago. In all honesty, I am in awe of economics bloggers in general.” 

Washington Post’s Monkey Cage:  “A lot of politics things I look at regularly (Pew, Gallup, think-tank posts, SSRN) are informative and, frequently, a pleasure to read. But the Monkey Cage is quite indispensable for consistently being both.” 

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