What’s Slate Voice?

Introducing Slate Voice, a Spoken Edition of the Magazine

Introducing Slate Voice, a Spoken Edition of the Magazine

The inner workings of Slate.
July 11 2017 10:23 AM

Introducing Slate Voice

A daily spoken edition of the magazine.

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Reading Slate is easy. You can do it almost anywhere: on your computer at work, with MarketingReport_MayJun.xlsx a keystroke away in case your boss walks by; on your phone while stuck in subway tunnel on the way home; seated in a comfortable leather armchair after dinner, with a snifter of port in one hand and your iPad in the other.

Gabriel Roth Gabriel Roth

Gabriel Roth is a Slate senior editor and the editorial director of Slate Plus. Follow him on Twitter

But what about those other times? When you’re driving your car, or running, or putting together a particularly complex piece of Ikea furniture? At such times, you might find yourself unable to read Slate, yearning for someone—a butler, perhaps—to read Slate to you.

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That’s when you need Slate Voice—a daily spoken edition of Slate that’s just for Slate Plus members.

Every day, our editors will handpick a selection of the magazine’s best stories to be recorded by a team of professional narrators. Slate Plus members can hear each day’s selection via a special podcast feed.

As well as the latest pieces from Jamelle Bouie, Dahlia Lithwick, and other current contributors, we’ll also record classic Slate pieces by Emily Bazelon, Michael Kinsley, Malcolm Gladwell, Marjorie Williams, Christopher Hitchens, Michael Lewis, Emily Yoffe, Meghan O’Rourke, and other voices who contributed to Slate over its first two decades.* In the player below, you can listen to Nora Caplan-Bricker’s August 2016 feature about how airlines handle accusations of sexual assault on their planes, winner of the inaugural Rally prize for a feature story, awarded by Raliance and the Poynter Institute.

And if you join Slate Plus today, you can try Slate Voice free for two weeks. You’ll get up to five articles every day—that’s more than two hours of listening time every week. It’s the perfect way to read Slate when you can’t read Slate. Find out more at slate.com/voice.

*Correction, July 11, 2017: This post originally misspelled Malcolm Gladwell’s first name.