Play Slate's new political prediction game, which tests your skill at forecasting the outcome of the midterm elections.

The inner workings of Slate.
Aug. 9 2010 10:33 AM

Introducing Lean/Lock

Play Slate's new political prediction game, which tests your skill at forecasting the outcome of the midterm elections.

Today Slate is launching Lean/Lock, a game that tests your skill at predicting the outcomes of the 2010 midterm elections. Think of it like fantasy baseball, but for the most competitive House, Senate and gubernatorial races. Lean/Lock will reward you for your prescience, but also for your risk-management skills.

Jeremy Singer-Vine Jeremy Singer-Vine

Here's how it works. Between now and Election Day on Nov. 2, you'll be able to "lean" or "lock" to a candidate for each of the 28 competitive races we've selected. We'll be adding more races as the campaign heats up. Each day, you accrue points for each race that you've predicted correctly, with one catch: You earn more points if you've locked to a winner instead of just leaned. As you may guess, though, once you've locked, you can't change your mind for the rest of the game, with the exception of a one-time option to unlock one candidate.

Advertisement

The day after the election, we'll sort through the results and declare a winner—Slate's political prognosticator of the year. In the meantime, we'll use polls to calculate your estimated score. A full explanation for how all this works is available on the game's homepage.

You can access Lean/Lock two ways: via our app on Facebook or on Slate Labs, which also launches today. In either case, you'll need a Facebook account to play; the data on both versions are identical, so you can hop from one version to the other without losing your picks.

Official scoring starts on Aug. 16, so make sure your initial picks are in by then. Sign up now!

Like Slate on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

TODAY IN SLATE

Culturebox

The Ebola Story

How our minds build narratives out of disaster.

The Budget Disaster That Completely Sabotaged the WHO’s Response to Ebola

PowerPoint Is the Worst, and Now It’s the Latest Way to Hack Into Your Computer

The Shooting Tragedies That Forged Canada’s Gun Politics

A Highly Unscientific Ranking of Crazy-Old German Beers

Education

Welcome to 13th Grade!

Some high schools are offering a fifth year. That’s a great idea.

Culturebox

The Actual World

“Mount Thoreau” and the naming of things in the wilderness.

Want Kids to Delay Sex? Let Planned Parenthood Teach Them Sex Ed.

Would You Trust Walmart to Provide Your Health Care? (You Should.)

  News & Politics
Politics
Oct. 22 2014 9:42 PM Landslide Landrieu Can the Louisiana Democrat use the powers of incumbency to save herself one more time?
  Business
Continuously Operating
Oct. 22 2014 2:38 PM Crack Open an Old One A highly unscientific evaluation of Germany’s oldest breweries.
  Life
Gentleman Scholar
Oct. 22 2014 5:54 PM May I Offer to Sharpen My Friends’ Knives? Or would that be rude?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Oct. 22 2014 4:27 PM Three Ways Your Text Messages Change After You Get Married
  Slate Plus
Tv Club
Oct. 22 2014 5:27 PM The Slate Walking Dead Podcast A spoiler-filled discussion of Episodes 1 and 2.
  Arts
Culturebox
Oct. 22 2014 11:54 PM The Actual World “Mount Thoreau” and the naming of things in the wilderness.
  Technology
Future Tense
Oct. 22 2014 5:33 PM One More Reason Not to Use PowerPoint: It’s The Gateway for a Serious Windows Vulnerability
  Health & Science
Wild Things
Oct. 22 2014 2:42 PM Orcas, Via Drone, for the First Time Ever
  Sports
Sports Nut
Oct. 20 2014 5:09 PM Keepaway, on Three. Ready—Break! On his record-breaking touchdown pass, Peyton Manning couldn’t even leave the celebration to chance.