Slate's most-read stories.

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Dec. 28 2005 6:47 AM

Slate's Most-Read Stories

The 10 most popular articles of the year.

Illustration by Robert Neubecker.
Click image to expand.

During 2005, Slate covered the war in Iraq, Hurricane Katrina, and the future of the Supreme Court, but our most popular stories were, for the most part, about dogs, beer, celebrities, and naked ladies. Below you'll find a list of the 10 pieces that attracted the most readers this year.

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Don't see any of your favorites? Later this week, we'll publish a list of readers' top picks; send your vote for the best Slate story of 2005 to bestofslate@gmail.com. (E-mailers may be quoted by name unless they stipulate otherwise.)

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1) Dog Day Afternoon When summer fashions go bad.
By Amanda Fortini
Posted Wednesday, June 29, 2005

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2) When Tush Comes to Dove Real women. Real curves. Really smart ad campaign.
By Seth Stevenson
Posted Monday, Aug. 1, 2005

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3) Crazy for You How Michael Jackson got off.
By Emily Bazelon
Posted Monday, June 13, 2005

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4) Do Dogs Think? Owners assume their pet's brain works like their own. That's a big mistake.
By Jon Katz
Posted Thursday, Oct. 6, 2005

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5) Top Dog Why Americans love Labrador retrievers.
By Brendan I. Koerner
Posted Friday, July 8, 2005

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6) Kate Moss The ironies of her downfall.
By Amanda Fortini
Updated Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2005

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7) The Murder of Emmett Till The 49-year-old story of the crime and how it came to be told.
By Randy Sparkman
Updated Tuesday, June 21, 2005
8) Rachael Ray Why food snobs should quit picking on her.
By Jill Hunter Pellettieri
Posted Wednesday, July 13, 2005

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9) Welcome to Miller Time, Loser The great American beer crisis.
By Daniel Gross
Posted Monday, May 2, 2005

TODAY IN SLATE

Frame Game

Hard Knocks

I was hit by a teacher in an East Texas public school. It taught me nothing.

Yes, Black Families Tend to Spank More. That Doesn’t Mean It’s Good for Black Kids.

Why Greenland’s “Dark Snow” Should Worry You

If You’re Outraged by the NFL, Follow This Satirical Blowhard on Twitter

The Best Way to Organize Your Fridge

Politics

The GOP’s Focus on Fake Problems

Why candidates like Scott Walker are building campaigns on drug tests for the poor and voter ID laws.

Sports Nut

Giving Up on Goodell

How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.

Iran and the U.S. Are Allies Against ISIS but Aren’t Ready to Admit It Yet

Farewell! Emily Bazelon on What She Will Miss About Slate.

  News & Politics
Foreigners
Sept. 16 2014 4:08 PM More Than Scottish Pride Scotland’s referendum isn’t about nationalism. It’s about a system that failed, and a new generation looking to take a chance on itself. 
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 16 2014 4:16 PM The iPhone 6 Marks a Fresh Chance for Wireless Carriers to Kill Your Unlimited Data
  Life
The Eye
Sept. 16 2014 12:20 PM These Outdoor Cat Shelters Have More Style Than the Average Home
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 15 2014 3:31 PM My Year As an Abortion Doula
  Slate Plus
Slate Plus Video
Sept. 16 2014 2:06 PM A Farewell From Emily Bazelon The former senior editor talks about her very first Slate pitch and says goodbye to the magazine.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 16 2014 5:07 PM One Comedy Group Has the Perfect Idea for Ken Burns’ Next Project
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 16 2014 1:48 PM Why We Need a Federal Robotics Commission
  Health & Science
Science
Sept. 16 2014 4:09 PM It’s All Connected What links creativity, conspiracy theories, and delusions? A phenomenon called apophenia.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 15 2014 9:05 PM Giving Up on Goodell How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.