Slate's Greatest Hits

How to get the electronic books we've published.
Oct. 24 2001 7:44 PM

Slate's Greatest Hits

The best of our first five years; plus Bushisms, The Road to Chadville, and other downloads.

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Slate's Greatest Hits: The Best of Our First Five Years When it launched on June 24, 1996, Slate set out to publish smart, witty, provocative journalism that uses the Web inventively. We've changed a lot since then, but we like to think we're still doing just that. It is in this spirit that we offer Slate's Greatest Hits: The Best of Our First Five Years, a collection of 30 articles, including:

  • Dispatches From the1997 Presidential Inauguration, by Karenna Gore
  • "Internet Envy," by Michael Kinsley
  • "Go ahead—sleep with your kids," by Robert Wright
  • "Martin Scorsese: The vicar of cinema," by A.O. Scott
  • The Good Word: "Airline English—Why flight attendants talk like that," by Cullen Murphy

Plus much more from your favorite Slate writers.

Price: $2.95

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Click on the button above to buy and download Slate's Greatest Hits from bn.com.

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The Magic of Reading

"How can you have a paperless office, when reading on the computer screen is so awful? We are about to break through that barrier. And everything will change when we do." In this 1999 white paper, Microsoft researcher Bill Hill—who has spent more than 15 years studying typography and reading—lays out the ideas that led to the creation of the Microsoft Reader platform for electronic books. But Hill does more than that: He also explains why we read, how we read, and how we can revolutionize the act of reading on a computer screen. (Note: The Magic of Reading was written in 1999, which is why it refers to various technologies that didn't exist at the time but have since been developed. It also contains some graphics that look best when viewed on a desktop or laptop PC.)

Price: Free.

Click to download eBook

Download: Click here or on the button above to download The Magic of Reading as a free eBook. (File size: 265 KB.) You'll need the free Microsoft Reader software. Scroll down to "How To Get and Use Slate eBooks" to learn how to install it.

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George W. Bushisms, The Slate Book of The Accidental Wit and Wisdom of Our 43rd President Each week, Slate's Chief Political Correspondent Jacob Weisberg collects quotes from George W. Bush, such as, "I know how hard it is for you to put food on your family," and "It is clearly a budget. It's got a lot of numbers in it." We've collected the best tidbits into a book. Download a free sample below, or click here to buy the paperback book.

Price: Free excerpt. 

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Download:

Click here or on the button above to download a free excerpt from George W. Bushisms, The Slate Book of The Accidental Wit and Wisdom of Our 43rd President as an eBook. (File size 280 KB.) You'll need the free Microsoft Reader software. Scroll down to "How To Get and Use Slate eBooks" to learn how to install it.

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The Road to Chadville: Campaign 2000 as Seen From Cyberspace In July 1999, Slate chief political correspondent Jacob Weisberg filed his first dispatch from the 2000 presidential campaign trail: "Styles of Stiff," about the stylistic differences between Bill Bradley (whom he called "merely boring") and Al Gore ("actually a bore"). Over the next 18 months Weisberg followed Democrats, Republicans, Greens, and Reformers around the country, judging their stump speeches, refereeing their debates, and calling their bluffs—all the way to Florida and the U.S. Supreme Court. The Road to Chadville is a collection of his 154 articles, which were originally posted in Slate's "Ballot Box" department and includes an introduction by Slate editor Michael Kinsley.

Price: Free.

Click to download eBook

Download: Click here or on the button above to download The Road to Chadville as a free eBook. (File size 520 KB.) You'll need the free Microsoft Reader software. Scroll down to "How To Get and Use Slate eBooks" to learn how to install it.

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