Jerry Sandusky’s Charity, Infant Mortality, and Gun Rights for Felons: This Week’s Top MuckReads From ProPublica

Journalism in the public interest.
Nov. 18 2011 2:31 PM

Infant Mortality, Jerry Sandusky’s Charity, and Gun Rights for Felons

This week’s top MuckReads from ProPublica.

Governor Tom Corbett.
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett approved a $3 million grant to Jerry Sandusky's charity, the Second Mile.

Photograph by Mario Tama/Getty Images.

Here are this week's top must-read stories from #MuckReads, ProPublica's ongoing collection of the best watchdog journalism. Anyone can contribute by tweeting a link to a story and just including the hashtag #MuckReads or by sending an email to MuckReads@ProPublica.org. The best submissions are selected by ProPublica's editors and reporters and then featured on our site and @ProPublica.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett Approved Grant for Sandusky Charity, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
When Tom Corbett was Pennsylvania’s attorney general in 2008, he oversaw the beginning of the Jerry Sandusky investigation. Now governor, he approved a $3 million state grant to Sandusky's charity,the Second Mile. The grant is now on hold.
Contributed by @bponsot

Where City Factories, and Now Babies, Die, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
As local economies suffer, so do the chances of babies making it through the first year of their lives. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel notes that the U.S. has dropped in worldwide infant mortality rankings, with Milwaukee impacted especially hard.
Contributed by @RL_Miller

Felons Finding It Easy to Regain Gun Rights, New York Times
People with felony convictions forfeit their right to own guns, but thousands of felons each year, including those with violent histories, are finding those rights reinstated without even a hearing. The leniency varies based on the state.
Contributed by @jennifergollan

Critics: Fort Carson Policy Targeted Troubled, Wounded Soldiers, Stars and Stripes
An army corporal earned two valor medals in three years in the military, but his life was falling apart otherwise, testing positive for cocaine. The Army moved to get him out of the service, and critics claim Fort Carson is increasingly using the policy against soldiers accused of minor misconduct.
Contributed by @danielle_ivory

Right-to-Know Laws Often Ignored, Associated Press
More than 100 countries have laws granting citizens a right to know what their governments are up to, but whether they follow through on them is an open question. The Associated Press found that only 14 responded in full to a sample request before their legal deadline. More than half didn't respond, and three out of 10 didn't even acknowledge the request.
Contributed by @mattapuzzo

Daniel Victor is ProPublica’s social media editor.

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