Tell Us About Your Life Under Obamacare

Who's winning, who's losing, and why.
Sept. 24 2013 3:15 PM

Your Life Under Obamacare

We want to hear your personal stories about how President Obama’s health care plan is going terribly right or wrong.

President Obama listens to remarks from French President Francois Hollande in St. Petersburg September 6, 2013.
How will the health care scheme nicknamed for this man affect your life?

Photo by Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

On Oct. 1, no matter how Congress tries to delay or fumble, “Obamacare” will go into effect. Americans will begin signing up for the health insurance exchanges. (Those with incomes less than 400 percent of the federal poverty level will be able to receive subsidies to help cover the costs.)* They’ll chose one of four tiered health plans, from “bronze” up to “platinum,” and put their fates in the loving arms of private insurers and the Department of Health and Human Services.

Polling suggests that this will be horribly unpopular. Forget the polls, though—how’s it going to work? To figure that out, we’d like to hear from Slate readers. Starting in October, and continuing through 2014, we want to check in with a handful of readers from time to time and hear their stories of life under Obamacare. We’ll ask what’s up at regular intervals, and hear from you if something goes terribly wrong or terribly right.

If you’d like to be part of this feature, email obamacare@slate.com and explain briefly why your story will be worth sharing. We’re not looking for any one type of guinea pig; if your situation is particularly ordinary (struggling 23-year old looking for work) or particularly unique (nonunion underwater welder with a rare liver condition), write in with a paragraph or so. Just make sure to include your age, gender, and hometown.

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*Correction, Sept. 24, 2013: This piece originally stated that Americans with incomes less than 400 percent of the federal poverty level will be able to sign up on health insurance exchanges. In fact, all Americans may sign up; those at that level of income will be eligible to receive subsidies to assist with costs. (Return to the corrected sentence.)

David Weigel is a reporter for Bloomberg Politics

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