Michele Bachmann for president? Among Republicans, she's more popular than you think.

Who's winning, who's losing, and why.
March 24 2011 6:19 PM

Bachmann Overdrive

Michele Bachmann for president? Among Republicans, she's more popular than you think.

(Continued from Page 1)

The Roving Eye of the Media. Bachmann is one of the most-covered, most-quoted Republican members of Congress. This phenomenon began in October 2008, when she appeared on MSNBC's Hardball and mused about Democrats being investigated for anti-American thinking. It took on weight in 2009, during the rise of the Tea Party, as Bachmann rose from back-bench obscurity by one-upping her leadership on criticisms of President Obama. No one had to prod Bachmann to accuse Obama of engineering the "final leap to socialism," or saying the Serve America Act was effectively creating "re-education camps." According to Lexis-Nexis, since that first Hardball= appearance, Bachmann has been discussed on 127 episodes of the show.

Bachmann's arrival as a possible 2012 candidate sucks up some undetermined amount of media attention that would have otherwise gone to help introduce Pawlenty or another candidate. We don't know who that helps. The most-covered candidate of the 2010 cycle, according to Pew, was Christine O'Donnell, the quotable but hopeless U.S. Senate candidate in Delaware. That cut both ways for Republicans—it kept the spotlight away from some other flawed candidates, but it directed grass-roots money and energy into a lost cause when a lot of other conservatives could have used it.

The Tancredo Effect. In every presidential cycle there's a politician with a relatively small base—Dennis Kucinich, Tom Tancredo—who gets into the race not to win but to yank people closer to him on his pet issue. Bachmann is more credible than most candidates who try this. She raised $13.5 million for her gimme re-election in 2010. That's more than Mike Huckabee raised for his presidential candidacy from the day he entered to the day he won the Iowa caucuses in 2008.

For now, though, Republican strategists view Bachmann as a Tancredo-type candidate who can force her issues into the debate. Strategists I talked to on Thursday basically agreed that Bachmann would drive the field to the right, because she'd done it before, criticizing Republicans in 2010 for not immediately signing up for the repeal of the Affordable Care Act and casting a lonely vote against one of the short-term budget bills this year because it didn't defund "ObamaCare."

Oh, yes: Congress. After Bachmann bailed on a leadership contest in January, my colleague Noreen Malone wrote that Republicans had missed a chance to contain her. If she runs, Bachmann will be the only member of the House—the seat of Republican power right now—running the Lincoln Day and straw poll circuit. Her statements on the stump will be as prominent as anything Majority Leader Eric Cantor or Speaker John Boehner say. Having seen them wince when reporters asked them to respond to Bachmann's alternative State of the Union speech, or her claim of a "slush fund" in the Affordable Care Act, I can guess how excited her presidential race must make them. "Mr. Speaker, a member of your caucus, who is running for president, said in South Carolina today that your budget does not go far enough to scale back Social Security spending. What's your response to that?"

Advertisement

Palin Methadone. When Dana Milbank fulfilled a pledge to spend a whole month ignoring Sarah Palin in his columns, he joked that Bachmann was his "methadone." There is a Palin-shaped hole in the 2012 campaign, and the campaigns of people like Rick Santorum and Tim Pawlenty get a lot easier if Palin doesn't run. But if Bachmann runs, a lot of Palin's voters may gravitate to her. I haven't been to every Tea Party rally, so I could have missed one, but I've seen far more handmade Bachmann signs than I have Draft Santorum foam hands.

Bachmann and Palin are lumped together for an obvious reason—they're high-powered Republican women. But as that Luntz focus group showed, Bachmann is taken more seriously than Palin in some circles. While Palin is a pundit who communicates through social networks and Fox News, Bachmann has a vote in Congress and daily vulnerability to press ambushes. There are millions of Republican women who, in the age of Palin, like the idea of another female candidate. If Palin does pass on the 2012 race, what happens if she endorses Bachmann? This has been a sleepy, late-starting campaign so far. Today we may have seen its first serious dark-horse candidate.

TODAY IN SLATE

Foreigners

More Than Scottish Pride

Scotland’s referendum isn’t about nationalism. It’s about a system that failed, and a new generation looking to take a chance on itself. 

What Charles Barkley Gets Wrong About Corporal Punishment and Black Culture

Why Greenland’s “Dark Snow” Should Worry You

If You’re Outraged by the NFL, Follow This Satirical Blowhard on Twitter

The Best Way to Organize Your Fridge

Politics

The GOP’s Focus on Fake Problems

Why candidates like Scott Walker are building campaigns on drug tests for the poor and voter ID laws.

Sports Nut

Giving Up on Goodell

How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.

Is It Worth Paying Full Price for the iPhone 6 to Keep Your Unlimited Data Plan? We Crunch the Numbers.

Farewell! Emily Bazelon on What She Will Miss About Slate.

  News & Politics
Weigel
Sept. 16 2014 7:03 PM Kansas Secretary of State Loses Battle to Protect Senator From Tough Race
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 16 2014 4:16 PM The iPhone 6 Marks a Fresh Chance for Wireless Carriers to Kill Your Unlimited Data
  Life
The Eye
Sept. 16 2014 12:20 PM These Outdoor Cat Shelters Have More Style Than the Average Home
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 15 2014 3:31 PM My Year As an Abortion Doula
  Slate Plus
Slate Plus Video
Sept. 16 2014 2:06 PM A Farewell From Emily Bazelon The former senior editor talks about her very first Slate pitch and says goodbye to the magazine.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 16 2014 8:43 PM This 17-Minute Tribute to David Fincher Is the Perfect Preparation for Gone Girl
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 16 2014 6:40 PM This iPhone 6 Feature Will Change Weather Forecasting
  Health & Science
Science
Sept. 16 2014 4:09 PM It’s All Connected What links creativity, conspiracy theories, and delusions? A phenomenon called apophenia.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 15 2014 9:05 PM Giving Up on Goodell How the NFL lost the trust of its most loyal reporters.