Richard Poplawski's online trail leads neither far right nor far left. It's just confused.

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April 10 2009 5:17 PM

An Accused Cop Killer's Politics

Richard Poplawski's online trail leads neither far right nor far left. It's just confused.

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His site, Infowars, where Perkovic says Poplawski sought his news, is a pastiche of links to reports from far and wide, all seemingly driven by the need to get a real story Jones doesn't think is being told. In that sense, it seems almost apolitical. In another, it's about finding the hidden "other" that is running the show.

"All it is is mainstream links to government documents calling for one-world government," Jones said of his site.

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Indeed, Jones, whose latest documentary is The Obama Deception, says of his movie: "It's not about left or right. It's about one-world government." Trace these fears of one-world government back to their ur-texts and you will find, for instance, that the Trilateral Commission theories so popular among the right a decade ago had their start in a report on "suppressed news stories" by a left-leaning group called "Project Censored" (motto: "The news that didn't make the News").

Jones is into what we can only politely describe as an alternate interpretation of what exists around us. The 9/11 attacks were an inside job. The airplane contrails overhead are a giant biomedical experiment. Even a sponsor ad, read by Jones, sounds ominous: "Have you ever thought about what's in your shampoo, soaps, and detergent?"

Jones advocates saving and storing food, something Poplawski wrote of doing. Poplawski was not 100 percent with Jones on all things—he seemed to dislike the fact that Jones doesn't bait Jews and perseverate on race. What Poplawski seemed to find in Jones was a bridge from the near-mainstream to a level of paranoid obsession in search of an explanation for his life's failures. For that, one does not need an ideology, just an inclination.

Dennis B. Roddy is a reporter for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.