Obama and Clinton fight and also fight not to fight.

Who's winning, who's losing, and why.
March 6 2008 7:05 PM

Achieving the Right Level of Nasty

Obama and Clinton fight and also fight not to fight.

Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Click image to expand.
Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton

When Barack Obama's top strategist, David Axelrod, spoke to reporters on a conference call Wednesday, you could hear a siren in the background. It was just the usual city sounds outside of his Chicago office, but it matched the emergency tone of the call. In the wake of Obama's three losses in Ohio, Texas, and Rhode Island, Axelrod was opening up a new, aggressive front against Hillary Clinton. He spooled out a string of accusations about her undisclosed tax returns and White House records as if he'd been holding his breath for the last 12 months. In fact, he has. This was a public attack unlike any the campaign has issued before. "She is a habitual nondiscloser," said Axelrod, even as he criticized the Clinton campaign for running a "scorched earth" series of attacks on Obama recently.

John Dickerson John Dickerson

John Dickerson is Slate's chief political correspondent and author of On Her Trail. Read his series on the presidency and on risk.

The next day, Clinton's communications director, Howard Wolfson, followed with the political equivalent of Godwin's law by charging that the Obama campaign was imitating Ken Starr. At this rate, the campaigns will be trading expletives by April (that's already happening inside the Clinton campaign). If anything will save us from a perpetual seven-week harangue before the key Pennsylvania primary, it's that the penalty for going negative has increased at the same time that the candidates are increasingly tempted to push each other down the stairs. Instead of full-throttle, we may instead see each candidate with one foot on the gas and one foot on the brake over the next stretch.

Advertisement

It has been the natural rhythm of this campaign that when the candidates get tough, they back off. At the South Carolina debate in January, Clinton and Obama were as accusatory, bitter, and snippy as they had been all season; by the next contest, they were competing to describe how honored they were to run against the other. Checking the reconciliation reflex this time is the increased motivation the candidates have to attack. The Clinton team is convinced that the contrasts it drew with Obama helped win Ohio and Texas. Exit polls show that voters who made up their minds in the last three days, when Clinton's attacks were at their zenith, moved toward her. The campaign shows no sign of letting up. (With all that blood in the water, why swim away?)

The Obama campaign recognizes that taking the high road isn't an effective rebuttal—hence the Axelrod call Wednesday and Obama's raising of questions about Clinton's tax returns on the campaign trail.

The Clinton team is setting the same trap for Obama my 4-year-old sets for her older brother. She hits him, knowing that he'll get in trouble for hitting back. Right on cue, Clinton's senior aide Ann Lewis set it up. "I didn't realize their version of new politics was to recycle old Republican tactics," she said. If voters put both campaigns in the corner for a timeout, it may hurt Obama more, because his claim to be a new kind of above-the-fray candidate means he's held to a higher standard. If Obama pays no penalty for the fracas, the Clinton folks still take him for a roll in the dirt where he can't offer his appealing message of hope, change, inspiration, and hope. Clinton, by contrast, reinforces her fighter image.

This is not a new dilemma for Obama. We've been talking about it for a year. What's new is that he is under more pressure than ever to punch back. It's not just that he can't let Clinton's attacks hang in the air. He has to show Democrats that he's a fighter, too. The questions the Clinton campaign has been raising about him lately have all been in bounds, despite what Obama aides say. Obama's abilities as commander in chief, his ties to indicted longtime political ally Tony Rezko, and his position on NAFTA are all worthy subjects for debate. If he's going to be the nominee, he's going to face a lot worse from Republicans—and the barrage will be constant if he's president.

TODAY IN SLATE

War Stories

The Right Target

Why Obama’s airstrikes against ISIS may be more effective than people expect.

The One National Holiday Republicans Hope You Forget

It’s Legal for Obama to Bomb Syria Because He Says It Is

I Stand With Emma Watson on Women’s Rights

Even though I know I’m going to get flak for it.

Should You Recline Your Seat? Two Economists Weigh In.

Doublex

It Is Very, Very Stupid to Compare Hope Solo to Ray Rice

Or, why it is very, very stupid to compare Hope Solo to Ray Rice.

Building a Better Workplace

In Defense of HR

Startups and small businesses shouldn’t skip over a human resources department.

Why Is This Mother in Prison for Helping Her Daughter Get an Abortion?

Use Facebook to Reconnect With Old Friends, Share Photos, and Serve People With Legal Papers

  News & Politics
Foreigners
Sept. 23 2014 6:40 PM Coalition of the Presentable Don’t believe the official version. Meet America’s real allies in the fight against ISIS.
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 23 2014 2:08 PM Home Depot’s Former Lead Security Engineer Had a Legacy of Sabotage
  Life
Outward
Sept. 23 2014 1:57 PM Would a Second Sarkozy Presidency End Marriage Equality in France?
  Double X
The XX Factor
Sept. 23 2014 2:32 PM Politico Asks: Why Is Gabby Giffords So “Ruthless” on Gun Control?
  Slate Plus
Political Gabfest
Sept. 23 2014 3:04 PM Chicago Gabfest How to get your tickets before anyone else.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 23 2014 4:45 PM Why Is Autumn the Only Season With Two Names?
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 23 2014 5:36 PM This Climate Change Poem Moved World Leaders to Tears Today
  Health & Science
Science
Sept. 23 2014 4:33 PM Who Deserves Those 4 Inches of Airplane Seat Space? An investigation into the economics of reclining.
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 23 2014 7:27 PM You’re Fired, Roger Goodell If the commissioner gets the ax, the NFL would still need a better justice system. What would that look like?