360 Degrees of Anderson Cooper

Dubious and far-fetched ideas.
Jan. 10 2006 12:05 PM

360 Degrees of Anderson Cooper

What will he feel next?

In time, there will be healing ...
Click image to expand.
In time, there will be healing ...

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

ANNOUNCER: Shock. Grief. Outrage. Glee.

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One year after a devastating tsunami, four months after the fury of Katrina, mere days after a tragedy underground, which emotions will overtake Anderson Cooper next? Tonight, a special investigation on ANDERSON COOPER 360°.

ANDERSON COOPER: And good evening from CNN studios in New York, where we begin with a picture. Take a look. The man you see is 38 years old. A Manhattanite. A citizen, an employee, a friend, a son. His name: Anderson Cooper.

Most nights, he appears live on CNN to show you the devastation, destruction, disaster, sadness, and pain his countrymen endure.

But not tonight.

Tonight, he will explore Anderson Cooper. How one reporter copes while waiting for news, any news at all. A story of hope, and of prayers, ahead on 360.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

ANDERSON: Welcome back. Our topic is Anderson Cooper, so we have a lot to cover in these two hours. We begin at his workplace.

When Anderson Cooper isn't reporting from the field, he's broadcasting the news from CNN's New York headquarters. I just want to give you a sense of the place. Right outside this studio is a suite of offices. It is air-conditioned, it is fluorescent lit, the floors are covered with waxed linoleum. Downstairs, there's a cafeteria. You can see, in the blue uniforms, those are security guards checking the identity of all the people going in for food. You either have to be an employee or—or—or a guest. You can see it on their faces as they file in: The people here at CNN are desperate for news.

Back in the offices, which have seen so much heartbreak, so much joy, and so much heartbreak yet again, there's an intern. I believe she's—yes, she's printing out e-mails for Jack Cafferty's producer. It is literally happening as we speak. We are seeing things like this, just an outpouring of love and caring for people at this network. And people at this network are helping one another and standing by one another, and—

(VIDEO CLIP)

ANDERSON: Excuse me, Anderson, I'm sorry for interrupting. To listen to CNN employees thanking each other and complimenting each other, you know, I got to tell you, there are a lot of people out here who are very upset, and very angry, and very frustrated. And when they hear reporters and interns slap—you know, thanking one another, it just, you know, it kind of cuts them the wrong way right now.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

ANDERSON: Anderson, I get the anger that is out there, and I—I—I understand it. More could be done. In time, there will be investigations and lawsuits and, we hope, healing. But for now, there is anger and there is heartbreak. Some answers to some questions, we pray, when 360 returns.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

ANDERSON: Frustration at CNN. A dramatic scene. Why did it take so long for the commercial break to end? The segments seem to blend together. At times it's easy to forget what network you're on. At a certain point it feels like all the words have already been spoken: "When we return." "Welcome back." "Stunning development." On the surface, it all seems so mundane. The drama is happening deep underneath. It is hard to imagine a place more exposed to the elements. There—there has been anger, and especially in these last couple hours. There's a lot of finger-pointing going on. There is desperation and there is danger. The waves of sadness have just begun. And what is being done to stop it? What can be done to stop it?

360 hours a day, 360 days a week, the feelings don't let up for Anderson Cooper. We, of course, will bring them to you live.

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