Tales of Hoffman 

What really happened.
Aug. 21 2000 9:30 PM

Tales of Hoffman 

Steal This Movie! turns Abbie Hoffman into the civil liberties hero he never was. 

(Note: "Life and Art" is an occasional column that compares fiction, in various media, with the real-life facts on which it is ostensibly based.)

88000_88503_hoffman_young
Advertisement

Abbie Hoffman always wanted a movie made out of his life. Before becoming a political activist, he briefly ran an art-house cinema in his hometown of Worcester, Mass. Once famous, he hung out with actors and directors in Hollywood, and he titled his 1980 autobiography Soon To Be a Major Motion Picture (Universal optioned and then dropped the book). Now, 11 years after Hoffman's suicide at the age of 52, Steal This Movie! (a reference to Hoffman's famous manual on how to rip off the system, Steal This Book) has arrived.

Hoffman's longtime lawyer Gerald Lefcourt (played by Kevin Pollak in the movie) served as associate producer, and Hoffman's ex-wife Anita consulted on the script and visited the set. (She died of breast cancer in 1998.) Not surprisingly, the authorized-by-proxy biopic celebrates Hoffman as an anti-war protest leader who promoted countercultural values and was harassed by the U.S. government. But not until Hoffman goes underground following his 1974 arrest for cocaine dealing does Steal This Movie! depart seriously from the facts. In a wholly fictional subplot, the movie teams the fugitive Hoffman with an investigative reporter who helps him expose the FBI's ongoing covert war against the left.

The film begins with the investigative reporter visiting Hoffman (Vincent D'Onofrio) in the underground, and his questions set off a series of extended, true-to-life flashbacks: Hoffman disrupts the New York Stock Exchange in 1967 by throwing dollar bills to eager brokers on the floor; he attempts to "levitate" the Pentagon along with other anti-war protesters later that year; he leads the Yippies (the Youth International Party), the politicized group of hippies he co-founded, during their demonstration at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In the film, as in life, Hoffman and compatriots nominate a pig named Pigasus for president and also end up in a bloody, nationally televised fight with police over control of a city park. Steal This Movie! quotes heavily from the court transcripts of the subsequent Chicago Seven trial (1969-70), at which the ill-behaved, judge-defying defendants—Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Tom Hayden, and others—were convicted for conspiring to cause a riot and were also sentenced for contempt of court. (The Chicago Seven trial was the Chicago Eight trial until the judge separated Black Panther Bobby Seale's case from the others. Seale is in the celluloid courtroom, but this bit of history doesn't make it into the film.) As Steal This Movie! notes, the convictions were ultimately overturned.

Other minor historical inaccuracies: The film depicts Hoffman scaling a wall during the Pentagon demonstration and getting clubbed by military police. Jonah Raskin, Yippie minister of education and author of For the Hell of It:The Life and Times of Abbie Hoffman, says in an interview that the assault never happened. The movie pretends that the Chicago Seven defendants were united when they weren't. According to Raskin, Hoffman joked that it would be "cruel and unusual punishment to be in the same cell as Tom Hayden," and Hayden "wanted the trial to be about the war in Vietnam, [while] Abbie wanted it to be about the cultural revolution." The movie also ignores Hoffman's role at 1969's Woodstock, where he took the stage during a Who performance to make a political speech but was driven off by a knock to the head from Pete Townshend's electric guitar. The Vietnam War fades from the movie's view after the Chicago Seven trial, although it remained the country's most volatile political issue even after the drawdown of U.S. troops began in 1969. Nor does the movie recount Hoffman's attendance at the 1972 Democratic National Convention in Miami. "Abbie and Jerry [Rubin] were greeted as heroes," says his friend Jay Levin in Larry Sloman's oral biography of Hoffman, Steal This Dream.

The film then charts Hoffman's fall from radical favor, blaming it on government disinformation. Indeed, the government did plot against him, but Hoffman hadn't been a hero to everyone on the left. Feminists and others were fed up with his macho, look-at-me agitprop antics. In the radical newspaper Rat (1970), Robin Morgan wrote: "Goodbye to the notion that good ol' Abbie is any different from any other up and coming movie star … who ditches the first wife and kids. … Women are the real left." (Before coming to New York, Hoffman was married and had two kids with his wife Sheila, whom he later divorced. A chapter of his autobiography is titled "Faulty Rubber, Failed Marriage." The Sheila period isn't in the movie.)

The film doesn't gloss over Hoffman's numerous romantic liaisons, as wife Anita (Janeane Garofalo) acknowledges his extramarital adventures in the film. But it does downplay his drug habit. At one point the movie Anita tells Jerry Rubin, "You know Abbie didn't have a drug problem." But a friend quoted in Steal This Dream remembers that "Abbie really loved coke, it was his drug of choice."

Although Raskin says that Hoffman dealt cocaine for about two years before his 1974 arrest, Lefcourt alleges that Hoffman's bust was the unfortunate result of a "lark": Hoffman, perhaps with an eye toward a book, wanted to explore some outlaw activity before New York state's new strict Rockefeller drug laws went into effect. In the film, Anita also says the drug deal was part of the research Hoffman was doing for a book and that the FBI "used drugs as an excuse to bust Abbie for his politics."

88000_88504_hoffman_old

In both the movie and the true story, Hoffman skipped bail after his arrest, though he remained in contact with Anita and their son, america. He was also diagnosed as manic-depressive and put on lithium. And he fell in love with Johanna Lawrenson (Jeanne Tripplehorn), settling with her in upstate New York, where, under his alias Barry Freed, he became a leader in the successful enviro campaign to save the St. Lawrence River from winter dredging.

The movie distorts the record by mostly presenting Hoffman's life underground as one of isolation and deprivation, lived in cheap motels while working short-order-cook jobs. He did live that way. But he also lived in Mexico for a while, where he had a house with a swimming pool and horses; he and Johanna went to Europe, where they pretended to be food critics so they could eat at fancy restaurants; and he spent time in Los Angeles with people like Jack Nicholson and producer Bert Schneider. As a 1980 Washington Post article noted, "While underground, he would call the Associated Press and the local gossip columnists if he did not like a story.  He had interviews in Playboy and New Times magazines. He breezed into New York to have a birthday party with friends at an expensive Chinese restaurant and to autograph his new book in a bookstore downtown." Reporters had no trouble reaching him. The Post reported, "Local leftwing operators always had his underground area code and dial information.  Fifteen minutes or two days later, Hoffman would get in touch."

TODAY IN SLATE

History

Slate Plus Early Read: The Self-Made Man

The story of America’s most pliable, pernicious, irrepressible myth.

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada. Now, Journalists Can’t Even Say Her Name.

Mitt Romney May Be Weighing a 2016 Run. That Would Be a Big Mistake.

Amazing Photos From Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution

Transparent Is the Fall’s Only Great New Show

The XX Factor

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada

Now, journalists can't even say her name.

Doublex

Lena Dunham, the Book

More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.

What a Juicy New Book About Diane Sawyer and Katie Couric Fails to Tell Us About the TV News Business

Does Your Child Have Sluggish Cognitive Tempo? Or Is That Just a Disorder Made Up to Scare You?

  News & Politics
Damned Spot
Sept. 30 2014 9:00 AM Now Stare. Don’t Stop. The perfect political wife’s loving gaze in campaign ads.
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 29 2014 7:01 PM We May Never Know If Larry Ellison Flew a Fighter Jet Under the Golden Gate Bridge
  Life
Quora
Sept. 30 2014 9:32 AM Why Are Mint Condition Comic Books So Expensive?
  Double X
Doublex
Sept. 29 2014 11:43 PM Lena Dunham, the Book More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.
  Slate Plus
Slate Fare
Sept. 29 2014 8:45 AM Slate Isn’t Too Liberal. But… What readers said about the magazine’s bias and balance.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 29 2014 9:06 PM Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice Looks Like a Comic Masterpiece
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 30 2014 7:36 AM Almost Humane What sci-fi can teach us about our treatment of prisoners of war.
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 30 2014 7:30 AM What Lurks Beneath The Methane Lakes of Titan?
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 28 2014 8:30 PM NFL Players Die Young. Or Maybe They Live Long Lives. Why it’s so hard to pin down the effects of football on players’ lives.