Will campaign-finance reform turn Billl Clinton into a kingmaker?

Political commentary and more.
March 18 2002 4:23 AM

Kausfiles Has Seen Bill Clinton's Future!

Campaign-finance reform could turn him into a kingmaker.

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There are technical details to be worked out, of course. Would the Alliance for Opportunity, Responsibility, etc., be a nonprofit group, and if so, what kind? If it's a nonprofit, the campaign-reform bills would seem to ban it from using unlimited donations to advertise during the 60 days prior to an election. But the 60-day restriction may not survive the court challenge—and even if it does, Clinton (acting on Dick Morris' advice) convinced many in 1996 that ads bought more than 60 days before an election can still have a big impact. Clinton would also have to be careful not to "coordinate" his efforts with the candidates he supports, and he'd have to do something to prevent contributions to his group from being deemed contributions to his wife, the senator from New York. Maybe his wife, who is periodically rumored to be considering a divorce, will solve this problem for him.

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I broached the independent fund-raising idea to a couple of Clinton insiders—people who would let me know if it was crazy—and they lit right up. ("He could have enormous influence," said one.) If Clinton hasn't already figured out that CFR holds the key to his future, someone should get on the phone to Chappaqua. And tell them kausfiles sent you!

Robert Kuttner cements his reputation as an economic forecaster: 

"Unemployment will stay moderately high this year—at least in the 6 percent range."

       —Robert Kuttner, "Enronomics, Anyone,"  the American Prospect, Feb. 27.

"… the economy created 66,000 jobs last month, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.5 percent, from 5.6 percent in January, according to the Labor Department's seasonally adjusted numbers."

       —The New York Times, 10 days later.

 

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