Will Texas’ Refusal to Grant Gay Divorces Be the Next Front in the Marriage-Equality Wars?

The law, lawyers, and the court.
Sept. 11 2013 2:25 PM

Texas Hold ’Em

The state refuses to allow same-sex couples married elsewhere to get divorced. Is this the next constitutional showdown over marriage equality?

Greg Abbott
Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, pictured here at an anti-abortion rally at the Capitol in Austin, Texas, on July 8, 2013, argues that because Texas doesn't recognize same-sex marriage, it can't grant a same-sex divorce.

Photo by Mike Stone/Reuters

The court papers don’t tell us all that much about what happened between the couple described only as “J.B.” and “H.B.” We can assume there once was love and then, at some point, there wasn’t. Their parting, we’re told, was amicable.

The problem is that J.B. and H.B. are both men. The other problem is that they live in Texas. The two were married in Massachusetts in 2006, where same-sex marriage has been legal since 2004. They later moved to Texas, and now want to get divorced. Texas, however, won’t let them. And they cannot get divorced in Massachusetts either, because that state—like all states—has a residency requirement for divorce.

Thus, unless they uproot their current lives in Texas and move to a state that will grant same-sex divorces, J.B. and H.B. are locked into their marriage. They are in perfect legal limbo. And they are in it together until death—or the state of Texas—do them part. Being trapped in a marriage one wishes to leave is a situation one court (referring to an opposite-sex marriage) once described as “cruel and unusual punishment”—placing the spouses “in a prison from which there was no parole.”

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J.B. sought a divorce from H.B. in Texas in 2009, and a family court judge granted the petition, holding that Texas' Proposition 2, which prohibited the court from recognizing a same-sex marriage, violated the due-process and equal-protection guarantees of the Constitution. But in 2010 a three-judge panel of Texas’ appeals court reversed the family court ruling, declaring that because same-sex marriages or civil unions are barred by a 2005 voter-approved amendment to the Texas Constitution and Family Code, Texas courts have no jurisdiction to grant same-sex divorces. Divorcing a same-sex couple would require the state to recognize that they were married in the first place. And this, the state says, it cannot do.

On Nov. 5 the Supreme Court of Texas will hear arguments regarding whether the men’s constitutional rights are violated by not granting them a divorce. J.B. and H.B.’s case is actually one of two same-sex divorce cases now pending before the Texas Supreme Court. In a second case, the same-sex divorce was granted to a lesbian couple after a state appeals court determined that the state of Texas intervened too late.

These cases have placed Texas’ highest state officials in the ironic—one could even argue rather romantic—position of fighting to keep two gay couples married to one another. Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott intervened in the J.B and H.B. divorce case, taking the position that “because the Constitution and laws of the state of Texas define marriage as the union of one man and one woman, the court correctly ruled that Texas courts do not have authority to grant a same-sex divorce." Any other ruling, he said in a statement, would allow other states to impose their values on Texas.

This is not just a Texas problem. More than 30 states ban same-sex marriage by constitutional amendment or statute. While Georgia, for instance, explicitly bars same-sex divorce, Texas and most of the others prohibit only gay marriage. So J.B. and H.B. may well reflect the new frontier in the same-sex marriage wars: What to do about states declining to grant divorces to legally married couples? According to the brief filed by J.B., right now in the U.S., “over 28 percent of the U.S. population lives in a jurisdiction where same-sex marriage is permitted." He adds that "Texas is one of the fastest growing states — attracting thousands of migrants each year, including couples from those states that permit same-sex marriage."

Texas, meanwhile, takes the position that being forced to recognize same-sex divorce is no different from being forced to accept gay marriage. In an amicus brief filed before the state Supreme Court on Texas’ side of the case, a Republican state legislator contends that “this lawsuit demonstrates that opponents of traditional marriage want to exclude the people of Texas from the legislative process — and then they want to exclude the legal representative of the people of Texas, the Attorney General of Texas, from the judicial process.”

For his part, J.B. contends that no one is asking Texas to issue any same-sex couple a marriage license or to afford them any of the benefits of being married in Texas. Marriage and divorce are different beasts, he claims. And nothing in the text or intention of the Texas ban on same-sex marriages is violated by allowing them to divorce. Daniel Williams of Equality Texas, the statewide LGBT advocacy group, says that “granting a divorce is not creating a marriage. In fact the law is very clear: the ability to get a divorce is a benefit of living in Texas, not a benefit of marriage.”

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