The ethics charges against District Attorney Mike Nifong.

The law, lawyers, and the court.
Feb. 7 2007 3:59 PM

Prosecutor Protector

The ethics charges against District Attorney Mike Nifong are a rarity.

Durham District Attorney Mike Nifong. Click image to expand.
Mike Nifong

What should happen to Mike Nifong? Nothing good, according to just about everyone who has weighed in on the fate of the North Carolina district attorney. Responding to the fallout from the poorly supported rape charges Nifong filed last spring against three former Duke lacrosse players, Gov. Mike Easley recently called the district attorney his "poorest appointment." The North Carolina State Bar has brought new ethics charges against Nifong, accusing him of withholding DNA evidence that could have exonerated the defendants and then denying that he knew about it. Nifong had previously been charged with making prejudicial statements to the press and is scheduled go on trial for all the violations in May or June.

A prosecutor screws up and faces public disgrace and the prospect of real punishment—most of us wouldn't want it any other way. As University of North Carolina professor Joseph Kennedy put it, "If these allegations are true and if they don't justify disbarment, then I'm not sure what does." Yet much of the time, prosecutors accused of withholding evidence don't face ethics charges or any other sort of public censure. That's the case even if their misconduct leads not only to shaky indictments, as happened in the Duke case, but to years in prison for people who turn out to be innocent. The latest chapter of the Nifong saga is thus the exception to a long-standing rule: Prosecutors are rarely punished for breaking the rules designed to ensure that defendants get a fair trial.

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It's hard to track a nonoccurrence, but here are the results of a couple of efforts. A Chicago Tribune series found that between 1963 and 1999, 381 state murder defendants received new trials because of prosecutorial misconduct like withholding evidence or suborning perjury. But no prosecutor was publicly sanctioned or disbarred by the state bar in connection with any of these cases. The Center for Public Integrity, an investigative journalism group, has found 2,012 cases since 1970 in which appeals judges threw out an indictment, conviction, or sentence based on a prosecutor's error or flouting of the rules. Using a separate data set, the center found only 44 cases during the same time period in which prosecutors appeared before a state bar because of allegations of misconduct.

There's an argument that the small number of disciplinary actions against prosecutors is the right number. To begin with, it's rare to see a lawyer punished for anything other than taking a client's money or leaving his case to die for want of attention. And in many cases, accusations against prosecutors rest on hard-to-prove subjective determinations. Did a prosecutor know the witness he put on the stand would give false testimony? Did he realize the significance of the evidence he failed to turn over to the defense? Frivolous charges can become a form of harassment. And most district attorneys' offices would rather handle a prosecutor's misbehavior internally than invite the outside scrutiny of a bar association or state grievance committee. Miscreant prosecutors may well get demoted or fired more often than they get disbarred.

But given prosecutors' broad discretionary powers—they get to choose whom to indict for what—the threat of a reprimand or even a lost job may not be a stiff enough penalty when a district attorney encourages a witness to give false testimony, plants false evidence, or, more commonly, keeps secret evidence that's supposed to be shared with the defense. Unlike other lawyers, prosecutors swear not only to do their best to win, but also to "seek justice." They're supposed to turn over all exculpatory evidence to the defense—as Nifong seems to have failed to do—in order to ensure that the proceedings against the defendant are fair.

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