Sins of commissions.

The law, lawyers, and the court.
Sept. 8 2004 11:11 AM

Sins of Commissions

Why aren't we using the courts-martial system at Guantanamo?

(Continued from Page 1)

In stating that the rules governing courts martial do not apply to commissions, the administration has placed itself in stark contrast to other administrations. Even in the midst of the Vietnam war, with thousands of dead, President Nixon's Defense Department examined the commissions option and concluded that "the specific protections of the Bill of Rights, unless made inapplicable to military trials by the Constitution itself, have been held applicable to courts-martial. Both logic and precedent indicate that a lesser standard for military commissions would not be constitutionally permissible."

Sen. Kerry's views closely resemble those of President Nixon's Defense Department, whereas (as I have said elsewhere in Slate) President Bush's closely resemble those of King George III.

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In the end, the real justification for military commissions has been the Bush administration's hope that no preexisting rules would mean no limits—in other words, that the commissions would permit the government to proceed at its convenience and whim. That type of thinking animated the decision to warehouse detainees at Guantanamo Bay in the first place, and it was rejected by the Supreme Court this past June. The danger with these commissions comes not only in their threat to our Constitution, and our standing in the world as a beacon of fairness, but also in their challenge to the perception of military justice. Our nation—whomever the next president may turn out to be—should admit it made a mistake and return to using our powerful and fair system of courts martial—a system that would generate swifter convictions of terrorists. As our nation's great Chief Justice John Marshall put it in 1803, ours is a "government of laws, and not of men."

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