The Tenant

The Tenant

Primary sources exposed and explained.
May 9 2006 5:51 PM

The Tenant

VIEW ALL ENTRIES

The New York City Carpenters' Union—more precisely, its  pension fund—is trying to evict   Hot 97  (WQHT), a hip-hop radio station, from a building it owns just south of the meatpacking district. In a court filing, the Carpenters' Union alleges that Hot 97's presence has led to a series of violent incidents, including three shootings. The Carpenters' Union is also seeking to eject two comparatively peaceable radio stations—KISS-FM (WRKS, R & B) and CD 101.9 (WQCD, jazz)—because they are owned by the same parent company. Last week Hot 97 countersued, seeking damages for breach of contract and complaining that the Carpenters' Union no longer allows any visitors to the radio station, making it impossible to conduct interviews there.

I'm no expert on real-estate law, but in its court filing, the Carpenters' Union persuades me that having Hot 97 in the building is extremely stressful for the other tenants. To read the annotations (below, and on succeeding pages), roll your mouse over the portions highlighted in yellow. The complete document can be found here.

Advertisement

If you have a document you'd like to suggest for this column, please e-mail me atdocuments@slate.com. Please indicate whether you'd like to be mentioned by name.

i.e., eviction.
In its countersuit, Hot 97 says that beginning May 1, the Carpenters' Union "imposed a total ban on Tenant having any guests or visitors to the Premesis." On May 9 the judge ruled that Hot 97 may have visitors, but only one at a time, and only if Hot 97 posts a security guard outside. The judge has not yet ruled on the Carpenters' Union's proposed eviction.
1_123125_2137821_2137075_2140976_2141210_060507hiphop1_g_03