Slate's History Week.

How we interpret the past.
May 20 2005 3:10 PM

Interpreting the Past

Slate's History Week.

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This week is History Week at Slate. We'll be publishing essays on new books about history, as well as a debate about how American historians are teaching the past. On this page, you can find an updated list of articles each day. And don't forget, you can join the discussion in the Fray by clicking on the links at the bottom of the page.

Tuesday

"The Malleable Estate: Is marriage more joyful than ever?" by Alan Wolfe, posted May 17, 2005.

"The Spirit of the Letter: What biographers find in other people's mail," by Megan Marshall, posted May 17, 2005.

"American History 101: The crisis in education," by Diane Ravitch and Jon Wiener, posted May 17, 2005.

"A Theater of War: Benjamin Franklin's dramatic role in American history," by Rachel Cohen, posted May 17, 2005.

"That Barnes & Noble Dream: The fight between academic historians and popularizers like David McCullough," by David Greenberg, posted May 17, 2005.

Wednesday

"American History 101: The dangers of oversimplifying in the classroom," by Diane Ravitch and Jon Wiener, posted May 18, 2005.

"Deconstructing Teddy: The darker side of the convivial president," by Mark Lewis, posted May 18, 2005.

"That Barnes & Noble Dream: What's wrong with the David McCulloughs of history," by David Greenberg, posted May 18, 2005.

Thursday

"American History 101: Do contemporary politics belong in a course on U.S. History?" by diane Ravitch and Jon Wiener, posted May 19, 2005.



"Bar Mitzvah Madness: The bar mitzvah's history holds a clue to saving the modern-day ritual," by Emily Bazelon, posted May 19, 2005.

"The Trouble With Harry: A new biography of Blackmun fails to do the Supreme Court justice," by Cliff Sloan, posted May 19, 2005.

Friday

"Uncle Tom's Children: Why has Uncle Tom's Cabin survived—and thrived?" by Stephen Metcalf, posted May 20, 2005.

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