Ron Radosh on The American Conservative.

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Oct. 5 2002 1:20 AM

Thug Life

The Fray dissects The American Conservative.

(Continued from Page 8)

In a just world, any time that a war hawk uses the term "appeasement" when attacking Iraq war opponents, a huge cartoon Monty Python fist ought to come down and squish them ... Appeasement is not failing to invade a sovereign nation. The proper term for that is called "Civilization." 

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Death and the salesman: There is much discussion of the Administration's "sales pitch." Matt says no pitch could work:

The reason for the fundamental dishonesty of Bush's sales job is that the real reason for a war is just not appealing enough.

But The Bell says all this attention to sales misses the point (apologies for the truncation):

Kinsley says facts do not matter, sales pitch matters; and since President Bush has not been a good salesman, he is a fatuous hypocrite even if he is ultimately right. The converse being that he is a great leader if he knows he is wrong but can lie convincingly. For my money, THAT makes Mr. Kinsley the reductio ad absurdum of Marshall McLuhan.

Rhyme and reason: Regular contributors to the Poems Fray are hanging out in Readme to give Kinsley's "Charge of the Right Brigade" some Tennysonian support. Persephone leads off here:

"Forward the Right Brigade"

Was there a fear allayed?

No tho the people knew

Some one had bluster'd

Is this a casus belli?

Should W provide a "why"?

Can we do naught but sigh?

Into the alley bereft

are shoved the one hundred

Those crazy kids: From the metaphor alert file: Southern Gentleman here thinks we are children who need Bush's fatherly protection; &kathleen here thinks kindergartener Bush needs to get his name on the board ... 12:00 p.m.

J.D. Connor is assistant professor of English and of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard. He is working on a book about neoclassical Hollywood.

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