Our fascism reading group discusses Romania and the Iron Guard.

Bloody, Mystical, and Especially Anti-Semitic: Our Fascism Reading Group on Romania’s Iron Guard

Bloody, Mystical, and Especially Anti-Semitic: Our Fascism Reading Group on Romania’s Iron Guard

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Feb. 17 2017 2:06 PM
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Romania: Bloody, Mystical Fascism From the East

The third episode of our Slate Academy asks if the experience of Romania changes our understanding of fascism’s origins.

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Romanian politician Corneliu Zelea Codreanu, wearing Romanian peasant dress, inspects members of the Iron Guard, in Romania, circa 1934.

Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Following our discussions of fascism in Italy and Spain, Fascism: A Slate Academy arrives at an Eastern example: Romania, where the movements of the 1920s and 1930s were particularly bloody, mystical, and anti-Semitic. We turn to Radu Ioanid, historian and archivist at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and author of The Sword of the Archangel: Fascist Ideology in Romania, to try to understand the difference

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