Why do so many Greenlanders kill themselves?

Notes from different corners of the world.
Oct. 9 2009 9:39 AM

The Suicide Capital of the World

Why do so many Greenlanders kill themselves?

Crosses in a graveyard next to the water in Nuuk, Greenland. Click image to expand.
Crosses in a graveyard next to the water in Nuuk, Greenland

NUUK, Greenland—The posters are plastered on school walls and at bus stops across Greenland's capital city. The message, aimed at teenagers, is a direct plea to use a special hot line: "The call is free. No one is alone. Don't be alone with your dark thoughts. Call."

If you know anything about Greenland, you know that it is the world's largest island. You know that it is the least densely populated country on the planet. You might even know that Richie Cunningham spent two seasons of Happy Days stationed here with the Army.

Know this, too: Greenland is the country with the world's highest suicide rate. The rate here is 24 times that seen in the United States. Even Japan—a nation with a well-documented suicide epidemic—has an annual rate of only about 51 people per 100,000 inhabitants. Greenland's is 100 per 100,000.

If that statistic isn't sobering enough, there's also the fact that the majority of Greenlanders who kill themselves are teenagers and young adults. (In most other countries, the elderly dominate suicide statistics.) Young men here are especially prone to an early exit and account for more than half of all suicides, although the girls hold their own. In a 2008 survey, one in four young women in Greenland admitted to trying to kill herself.

Bodil Karlshøj Poulsen, director of Paarisa, Greenland's public-health center. Click image to expand.
Bodil Karlshøj Poulsen, director of Paarisa, Greenland's public-health center

"Every young person in Greenland knows someone who has committed suicide," Bodil Karlshøj Poulsen, director of Paarisa, the country's public-health center, told me. "It's a new phenomenon."

Indeed, for the first half of the 20th century, Greenlanders lived much as they had for the previous 4,000 years: They hunted and fished, clustering in small, remote villages that hug the rocky coastline. They also boasted a suicide rate among the world's lowest. One Danish analysis found that from 1900 to 1930, Greenland had an annual suicide rate of just 0.3 people per 100,000. And "as late as 1960 there was still the occasional year when there were no recorded suicides by Greenlanders," reports Jack Hicks, a Canadian expert on suicide in the arctic region.

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In 1970, the number of suicides began to rise, and for most of the next 16 years, the rate inched upward. When it peaked in 1986, suicide was the leading cause of death for young people in several towns. Sarfannguit, a fishing community reachable only by dogsled or boat, was one such place.

"In the '90s we had a couple of young people who did it," said Sarfannguit's former mayor, Ludvig Sakæussen, during an afternoon walk around the cliff-side community.

A "couple" doesn't sound like many until you consider that Sarfannguit has only about 150 residents.

"Depression is bad in the winter, but we're working on our public-health issues, especially for our young people," Sakæussen said as we toured the town's market and bought a warm, $3 Coke and a cold, stale Danish pastry. Asked how Sarfannguit works to improve its public health, the former mayor mentioned soccer and pingpong.

"You can't underestimate the impact sport can have," he said.

One reason for Greenland's high suicide rate is that people are particularly proficient at the act, employing methods that leave little chance for survival. Shootings and hangings account for 91 percent of male suicides and 70 percent of female suicides. (Almost every Greenland home has at least one rifle for the annual caribou and musk-ox hunts. Of course, any rope, fishing net, or electric cord can be fashioned into a noose, which in the Greenlandic language is called "our Lord's lasso.")

"Young people in Norway and Sweden make a lot of suicide attempts with pills, but they're not successful. Here the kids are successful because it's always so violent," said Poulsen.

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