The Campaign on the Web

March 7 2000 9:30 PM

The Campaign on the Web

By their Web sites ye shall know them. The presidential candidates have staked their places on the Web to raise money, to distribute speeches and position papers, and to show off their cybersavvy. Some sites are better than others. Here's a quick guide.

Advertisement

Democrats

Al Gore's Web site

Lest anyone associate Gore with Bill Clinton's sex life, two of the departments you can click to from any page are "The Gore Family" and "Tipper Gore." And while other sites gloss over the legal rules for giving money, this contribution form requires donors to check boxes stating, "I am not a foreign national who lacks permanent resident status in the United States," and "The funds I am contributing are my own personal funds and not those of another." The "Agenda"  amplifies proposals on a wonkish array of issues. (The Spanish site is almost as diligently detailed.) Gore underscores his fiscal discipline mantra with a pie chart that lays out how he would allocate the budget surplus. Gore's kid's corner seems geared toward budding geeks. An interactive seek-a-word puzzle takes 20 minutes to solve. Quiz questions include: "How many counties are there in [Iowa]?"

Bottom Line: Cybersprawl

Lyndon LaRouche's Web site

Listen to the uplifting Webcasts of Lyndon wisdom. LaRouche on the American condition: "We've become a nation of cowards, who lie most of the time." A speech warns of the impending world financial crash and advises that "the German General Staff was a Jewish conspiracy!" " LaRouche's Exoneration" page explains how Henry Kissinger framed Lyndon on tax charges (the candidate served five years in federal prison). This page attempts to explain LaRouche's catchy campaign slogan--a call for "A New Bretton Woods." Don't miss LaRouche's campaign humor page. One gem: "By releasing water to permit his canoe trip… Vice-President Gore has dammed himself."

Bottom Line: Now we know who's buying all those drugs from the queen

Green Party

Ralph Nader's Web site

TODAY IN SLATE

History

Slate Plus Early Read: The Self-Made Man

The story of America’s most pliable, pernicious, irrepressible myth.

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada. Now, Journalists Can’t Even Say Her Name.

Mitt Romney May Be Weighing a 2016 Run. That Would Be a Big Mistake.

Amazing Photos From Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution

Transparent Is the Fall’s Only Great New Show

The XX Factor

Rehtaeh Parsons Was the Most Famous Victim in Canada

Now, journalists can't even say her name.

Doublex

Lena Dunham, the Book

More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.

What a Juicy New Book About Diane Sawyer and Katie Couric Fails to Tell Us About the TV News Business

Does Your Child Have Sluggish Cognitive Tempo? Or Is That Just a Disorder Made Up to Scare You?

  News & Politics
Damned Spot
Sept. 30 2014 9:00 AM Now Stare. Don’t Stop. The perfect political wife’s loving gaze in campaign ads.
  Business
Moneybox
Sept. 29 2014 7:01 PM We May Never Know If Larry Ellison Flew a Fighter Jet Under the Golden Gate Bridge
  Life
Quora
Sept. 30 2014 9:32 AM Why Are Mint Condition Comic Books So Expensive?
  Double X
Doublex
Sept. 29 2014 11:43 PM Lena Dunham, the Book More shtick than honesty in Not That Kind of Girl.
  Slate Plus
Slate Fare
Sept. 29 2014 8:45 AM Slate Isn’t Too Liberal. But… What readers said about the magazine’s bias and balance.
  Arts
Brow Beat
Sept. 29 2014 9:06 PM Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice Looks Like a Comic Masterpiece
  Technology
Future Tense
Sept. 30 2014 7:36 AM Almost Humane What sci-fi can teach us about our treatment of prisoners of war.
  Health & Science
Bad Astronomy
Sept. 30 2014 7:30 AM What Lurks Beneath The Methane Lakes of Titan?
  Sports
Sports Nut
Sept. 28 2014 8:30 PM NFL Players Die Young. Or Maybe They Live Long Lives. Why it’s so hard to pin down the effects of football on players’ lives.