The Campaign on the Web
The Campaign on the Web
Nov. 30 1999 3:00 AM

The Campaign on the Web

(Continued from Page 1)

Bauer's site lets you pledge to write a check but, unlike other sites, doesn't let you use your credit card online. There's also an " Online Internship Application," which offers students experience in "correspondence, grassroots organization, volunteer coordination, fundraising, events planning and coordination, and media events." Hurry--the deadline for the fall term is Aug. 6.


Bottom line: Low-tech, high dudgeon


This site takes personalization to the next level, asking for information in return for an individualized pitch. An " Issues" page focuses on Bush's favorite topics, such as " Faith-Based Initiatives." The "En Español" section offers several pages in Spanish, including this item, which touts Bush's corazón y visión. An audio message of the day communicates directly to supporters. The " Youth Zone" explains Bush's view of politics--it's just like baseball! The parties are leagues, the primaries are playoffs, and the general election is the World Series.

Bottom line: Prosperity with a surface.


Calls itself "America's first full-scale Internet campaign" and is by far the most technically sophisticated site, with an array of slide shows, videos, and a " personal control panel" that repackages his position papers, speeches, and press releases as links from an icon symbolic of high-tech, individual empowerment.

Bottom line: The gold standard


Orrin Hatch #2:}}

Uncharacteristically hip in appearance, the home page features Hatch silhouetted against a black background. Supporters are encouraged to stuff virtual ballot boxes by a vote online page, which links to Internet polls. A page of media links invites disciples to write editors and create the illusion of a groundswell for their favorite dark horse. Weekly Hatch Toons attack the senator's opponents: A cartoon of a wayward youth smoking something quotes the parents' impression that their boy is "presidential material. ... If we can just hang on 'til he's 40."

Bottom Line: Spare and strange.

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