The 2005 Slate 60: Pledges

Analysis of the year's biggest philanthropists.
Feb. 20 2006 8:19 AM

The 2005 Slate 60: Pledges

The 60 largest American charitable contributions of the year.

(Continued from Page 2)

William S. Boyd—$25 million to the University of Nevada at Las Vegas, plus gifts to UNLV, the Boys & Girls Clubs, and the Las Vegas Performing Arts Center. Boyd, 74, chairman and chief executive officer of Boyd Gaming Corporation in Las Vegas, pledged $25 million to the University of Nevada at Las Vegas for its law school; $2.9 million of the pledge was paid in 2005; and the rest will be paid out in annual $1 million payments. Neither the law school nor the university existed when Boyd was a student so he earned his law degree at the University of Utah. But his concern that the Las Vegas metropolitan area had no law school was one of the reasons he helped establish the law school with a $5 million gift in 1997. A lawyer in Las Vegas for 15 years before joining his father in the hotel and casino business, Boyd made several additional gifts to groups in and around the city in 2005. He pledged $1 million, of which $400,000 has been paid, to help build the Las Vegas Performing Arts Center, and he gave $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Las Vegas and $1 million to the Henderson Boys & Girls Club in Nevada. Boyd said the clubs can use the money for any purpose.

Bradford Freeman—$26 million to the Stanford Institute for International Studies. Freeman, 63, co-founder of Freeman Spogli & Company, an investment firm in Los Angeles and New York, pledged $25 million to the Stanford Institute for International Studies, in California. The commitment is one-half of a joint $50 million pledge Freeman made with his business partner, Ronald Spogli. The money, $12 million of which Freeman paid in 2005, will endow the directorship of the institute and establish up to 10 interdisciplinary professorships in international studies throughout Stanford University, where the institute is located. He also pledged $500,000 to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library Foundation, in Simi Valley, Calif., and $400,000—$100,000 of which was paid in 2005—to Saint Johns Health Center, in Santa Monica, Calif. Freeman made gifts of $50,000 each to the Center for the Study of the Presidency, in Washington, and the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace, in Stanford, Calif. He also gave $10,000 to the Mayo Foundation, in Rochester, Minn.

Andrew S. Grove—$26 million to City College of New York. Grove, 69, founder and former chairman of the Intel Corporation, pledged $26 million to the City College of New York to establish an endowment that will support faculty members and students in the engineering program. The money will also pay for laboratory equipment and renovations, new programs, and research at the engineering school. City College received $5 million of the gift in 2005, and the remaining $21 million will be paid in $1 million annual installments over the next 21 years. Born in Hungary, Grove came to the United States in 1956 and graduated from the college in 1960.

Edward M. Warner—$26 million to the Colorado State University. Warner, 60, founder of Expedition Oil Company in Denver, pledged $26 million to Colorado State University in Fort Collins for its College of Natural Resources. He paid $1.9 million of the pledge in 2005. A geologist by training, Warner graduated from the university in 1968. He said $10 million of the $26 million pledge must be used to establish a natural-resources conservation center and support the center's endowment, professorships, programs, and student internships. Warner also designated $4 million of the pledge for the geosciences department and asked that $1.5 million support faculty research. Some of the pledge will be paid by 2010, but $10.5 million will go to the university upon Warner's death. The donor and university officials have not yet decided how the bequest amount will be used.

William J. Godfrey—$25 million to Indiana University.Godfrey, 63, president of Trinity Associates Real Estate in Hilton Head, S.C., has pledged land valued at $25 million to Indiana University in Bloomington for its Kelley School of Business. Some of the land—$2 million worth—was sold in 2005 and the money was given to the university. The university will receive the rest of the pledged land upon Godfrey's death. The money will be used for scholarships and for upkeep of the business school's building. Godfrey received his bachelor's degree from the university in 1964 and earned a master's degree there in 1968.

Bruce Kovner$25 million to the Juilliard School. Kovner, 61, chairman of Caxton Associates, a hedge fund in New York, pledged $25 million to the Juilliard School in New York and placed no restrictions on how the money, to be paid over five years, will be used. Juilliard has chosen to use the money to finance faculty salaries, scholarships, and facilities improvements. Kovner, chairman of the school's board of trustees, took harmony, piano, and other courses at Juilliard in the 1970s.

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Marlin Jr. and Regina Miller—$25 million to Alfred University. Marlin Miller Jr., the retired president of Arrow International, a medical-devices manufacturer in Reading, Pa., and his wife, Regina, pledged $25 million to Alfred University in New York to establish an endowment in the School of Art and Design. In addition, the money will endow six professorships and provide scholarships. Marlin Miller Jr. sits on the university's board of trustees and graduated from Alfred in 1954. 

Ronald Spogli—$25 million to the Stanford Institute for International Studies. Spogli, 59, co-founder of Freeman Spogli & Co., an investment firm in Los Angeles and New York, pledged $25 million—$12 million of which was paid in 2005—to the Stanford Institute for International Studies, in California. The commitment is one-half of a joint $50 million pledge Spogli made with his business partner, Bradford Freeman. The money will endow the directorship of the institute and establish up to 10 interdisciplinary professorships in international studies throughout Stanford University, where the institute is located. Spogli, who graduated from Stanford in 1970 with a degree in history, currently serves as the U.S. ambassador to Italy.

Larry H. and Gail Miller—$22.6 million to Salt Lake Community College. The Millers, who own Larry H. Miller auto dealerships in Salt Lake City and the Utah Jazz, pledged a combination of cash and land worth $22.6 million to Salt Lake Community College in Salt Lake City. Most of the money will go toward the university's new police safety training center and will pay for housing and training for police officers, firefighters, sheriffs, and prison guards. A portion of the pledge will also be used to build a culinary-arts school. The Millers, who also own a local sports arena, a television station, and commercial real estate in and around Salt Lake City, plan to build the police training and culinary centers on land they own, then donate the new buildings to the college once construction is complete.  

Sidney Kimmel—$22 million to the Sidney Kimmel Foundation. Kimmel, 77, chairman of Jones Apparel Group in Bristol, Pa., and co-owner of the Miami Heat basketball team, pledged $22 million to the Sidney Kimmel Foundation in Philadelphia. The foundation, which he started in 1993, supports the arts, cancer research, and Jewish causes. Kimmel serves as president and treasurer of the foundation.

Frank E. Eck—$21 million to the University of Notre Dame. Eck, 82, chairman of Advanced Drainage Systems, a drainage-pipe manufacturer in Hilliard, Ohio, pledged $21 million to the University of Notre Dame for its law school. He made the pledge, which will be paid over the next five years, specifically to help pay the construction costs of a new building. Eck graduated from the university in 1944 with a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. 

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